substantive

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substantive

relating to the essential legal principles administered by the courts, as opposed to practice and procedure.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, the apple is not a second time there, once in the adjectival and once in the substantival world.
The key issue regarding the space-time debate, which is still alive by the way, is whether it does really make sense to speak of either a substantival or a relational account of space-time.
(1) By [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] I mean the adjective [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], in any case, singular or plural, and also substantival forms; and similarly elsewhere in the paper for other adjectives.
Furdik illustrates the case with the substantival and the adjectival derivatives of the verbpisat 'to write'.
Note that in the majority of attestations, the internal argument of the verb underlying the nominalizations remains unexpressed, so that in predicative use these cases are ambiguous between adjectival and substantival use.
In Estonian one can find mostly the reduplicative substantival construction where the possessive genitive attribute is in the plural, e.g.
This latter claim may be dismissed outright, the substantival baud being printed repeatedly as early as 1859 in the Rolls Series edition of the Liber Albus, the early fifteenth-century administrative records of London: 'femme de fole vye, baude, putere, [...]' (p.
In the substantival step of derivation under the condition that there are no constraints on chronological heterogeneity (only the same year attestations are taken for chronologically homogeneous ones) the curves for the diachronic precedence of both classes of action nouns are flatter than the curves when action nouns find themselves in the position of a younger counterpart of a binary sequence (cf.
In the Physics Aristotle firmly denies that place is a three dimensional extension coextensive with the body, since that would let in substantival space.
Subjects can differentiate objective from subjective representations only by appealing to their explicit or (more usually) implicit causal and substantival beliefs.
As I have argued elsewhere, in Stainton (1994, 1995), words and phrases can be, and often are, used outside any sentence: E.g., one can begin a conversation with 'Hungry?', or 'A friend of yours?' Nor, it seems to me, is it because the content of (13) is too difficult to understand, when couched in these substantival terms: It's not as if these noun phrases are so much more difficult to parse than the corresponding interrogative sentence.