substantive

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substantive

relating to the essential legal principles administered by the courts, as opposed to practice and procedure.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Trilling's novel was a blueprint for the cultural reversal that became known as neoconservatism, but he removes his characters from the Jewish milieu where this movement actually ripened, thereby depriving the book of its social substantiveness" (The Modern Jewish Canon: A Journey through Language and Culture (New York: The Free Press, 2000], p.
The cationic character of a protein determines the ionic bonding (substantiveness) between protein and hair or skin.
This method at least allows one to assess the substantiveness of a relationship between the variables of interest, as shown in the present paper.
It is a detailed and useful reference book on the subject, though viewing the issue as an example of Sorelian `political myth' is rather contentious, necessarily dismissing the substantiveness of the public ownership issue and ignoring the problematic disjunctions between the inevitably revisionist accommodations of the politicians and the less constrained ideological debates outside.
These essays are remarkable for their substantiveness. Only four concentrate on a single Hemingway text, and even these four provide no narrow and niggling readings, but expansive discussions.
* Most requesters have not seen an increase in documents released, the substantiveness of the documents that are released, or in the time it takes to receive information.
the confidence interval overlapped the thresholds for substantiveness, then the true difference was deemed unclear (Batterham and Hopkins, 2006; Hopkins et al., 2009).
Hence this stuff might be called "mind/matter." Better, however, is "mind/math," for this replacement of "matter" by "math" emphasizes that what is present in nature is not the substantiveness, or rocklike quality, that we often associate with the word "matter" but rather a partial conformity to mathematical rules.