succession

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Succession

The transfer of title to property under the law of Descent and Distribution. The transfer of legal or official powers from an individual who formerly held them to another who undertakes current responsibilities to execute those powers.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

succession

n. the statutory rules of inheritance of a dead person's estate when the property is not given by the terms of a will, also called laws of "descent and distribution." (See: descent and distribution, inheritance)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

succession

following another, used in relation to the taking over of a body corporate including the Crown. Succession to the Crown is governed by law but can be upset by abdication. Technically, the area of law regulating the passing of property from a deceased person. See INTESTACY, TESTATE.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

SUCCESSION, in Louisiana. The right and transmission of the rights an obligations of the deceased to his heirs. Succession signifies also the estate, rights and charges which a person leaves after his death, whether the property exceed the charges, or the charges exceed the property, or whether he has left only charges without property. The succession not only includes the rights and obligations of the deceased, as they exist at the time of his death, but all that has accrued thereto since the opening of the succession, as also of the new charges to which it becomes subject. Finally, succession signifies also that right by which the heir can take possession of the estate of the deceased, such as it may be.
     2. There are three sorts of successions, to wit: testamentary succession; legal succession; and, irregular succession. 1. Testamentary succession is that which results from the constitution of the heir, contained in a testament executed in the form prescribed by law. 2. Legal succession is that which is established in favor of the nearest relations of the deceased. 3. Irregular succession is that which is established by law in favor of certain persons or of the state in default of heirs either legal or instituted by testament. Civ. Code, art. 867-874.
     3. The lines of a regular succession are divided into three, which rank among themselves in the following order: 1. Descendants. 2. Ascendants. 3. Collaterals. See Descent. Vide Poth. Traite des Successions Ibid. Coutumes d'Orleans, tit. 17 Ayl. Pand. 348; Toull. liv. 3, tit. 1; Domat, h.t.; Merl. Repert. h.t.

SUCCESSION, com. law. The mode by which one set of persons, members of a corporation aggregate, acquire the rights of another set which preceded them. This term in strictness is to be applied only to such corporations. 2 Bl. Com. 430.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sow it in tubs or window boxes outside in late spring and if you sow successionally through to June, you will be harvesting a fresh crop of leaves into August.
1 Sow carrots now and successionally over the next month in unmanured soil to get fresh young roots from July onwards.
For short-lived herbs such as this and basil, it's worth sowing successionally. That means sowing a small pot every few weeks rather than sowing the whole packet in one go.
You can sow it successionally from early spring until very late summer in shallow drills, harvesting it as a cut-and-come-again crop.
They sprout like grass when sown outdoors from March onwards and can be sown successionally until late May.
It has fresh, light green foliage and white flowers which open successionally throughout the summer.