successive sentences

successive sentences

n. in criminal law, the imposition of the penalty for each of several crimes, one after the other, as compared to "concurrent sentences" (at the same time). Example: Carl Convict has been found guilty of manslaughter, assault with a deadly weapon, and armed robbery, for which the maximum sentences are 15 years, 10 years, and 10 years, respectively. By imposing successive sentences, the judge adds the terms together and sentences Convict to 35 years. Had the judge made the sentences concurrent, the maximum total would be 15 years. (See: sentence, concurrent sentence)

References in periodicals archive ?
Successive sentences and subordinating clauses that are important in making expression fluent and effective can be constructed.
The judge added that each charge includes separate events, and involves a different victim, making successive sentences necessary.
As in earlier chapters, he jumps from idea to idea and manages to cover John Wesley's precepts on family and Roman Catholic subsidiarity in successive sentences (99).
Obama seemed the master of the anaphora, where a phrase is repeated at the beginning of successive sentences. This speech was an anaphoric marathon: "Together, we" gave way to "We, the people", which temporarily ceded the track to "Our journey is not complete until", before "You and I, as citizens" staggered to the tape with the baton.
(4) In the case of successive sentences for concurrent offences, the part of the complementary penalty executed until merging the main penalties shall be deducted from the duration of the complementary penalty imposed in addition to the resulting penalty.
those with while, about 88% of the time and successive sentences, i.e.
He traces the history of the Moral Majority to the "early 1970s" (190), although it was not established until 1979; in successive sentences, he misses by a year both the crucial Green v.
For example, at the beginning of the essay, the author claims--in successive sentences in a single paragraph--that the purpose of her essay is to: (1) develop a theory of gender and the state and apply that theory to the Caribbean; (2) develop a typology of gender systems and show how ideological and material relations within those systems reinforce one another; (3) interrogate the project of modernity in the Anglophone Caribbean; and (4) create a "gender analytical model that can be applied to studying a wide range of social and economic phenomena inherent in Caribbean and other societies" (26).
Count the number of words in successive sentences. If the piece is long, select several samples.
In addition, he uses the phrases `vertue or connyng' (100), `connyng and vertue' (66), `conning or vertue' (66), `conning and vertuouse' (24, repeating both words later in the same sentence), `vertuous and conning' (or `connyng' or `conyng') (24, 63, 64, 103), `litle conning and less vertue' (64), and links the words in the same and successive sentences on page 65.
Successive sentences and paragraphs often start with the same or similar phrases.
Slide #95: What's "wrong" with the chronology of these successive sentences? How might we eliminate the problem?
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