suddenness


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms.
See: dispatch
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The suddenness of an event shouldn't overturn the vessel; the management must put in place enough rafts and oars, to tide over the unexpected 'big wave'.
However, neither the suddenness of that crisis nor the global lack of empathy shown to the Syrian refugees could dwarf the Afghan refugee crisis.
The Regional Trial Court (RTC) however found Larry guilty beyond reasonable doubt of the crime of murder as the killing was attended with treachery because of the suddenness of his attack on Jim.
The suddenness of Sridevi's death has made me appreciate my loved ones more.
We are absolutely devastated by the suddenness of the way in which Christopher has been taken from us and our hearts are aching."
"And with the suddenness expressed in the phrase 'Here today, gone tomorrow', the difficulty we have now is that we feel so powerless.
Each of the seven stories stops with a suddenness which I think for some young readers could prove disturbing.
Thus, each painting is rich in playfulness, critique and indulgence of material: all enjoyed in the moment of a glance, in the suddenness of gaze.
The suddenness of the company's closure prompted discussion on social media, and several small businesses which shared the site with The Play Station are still attempting to reclaim items removed in the process, including pottery, ceramics, frames and photography.
"But the suddenness and speed of the provisioning in the second half of FY16 highlights how long it has taken to address poor balance-sheets.
Our sports reporter noted that the Blues were 'lulled into a false sense of security by the suddenness which they scored their first and second goals.
This, the most glorious achievement of the Romantic ballet, provides the highlight of "The Romantic Ballet in England", Ivor Guest's classic study which also describes the developments which led up to it and the sad decline that shortly afterwards overtook ballet with almost dramatic suddenness. From an exhaustive examination of contemporary accounts and memoirs, Ivor Guest brings to life the personalities of the ballet scene of that time including Lumley the impresario; the great Perrot himself; international stars such as Taglioni and Elssler, Cerrito and Carlotta Grisi; and the English dancers of more modest renown, of whom the most promising was the ill-fated Clara Webster.