sue


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SUE

To initiate a lawsuit or continue a legal proceeding for the recovery of a right; to prosecute, assert a legal claim, or bring action against a particular party.

sue

verb appeal to the law, apply for, ask for relief, bring a legal action, bring an action, bring to justice, bring to the bar, claim, commence a suit, contest, entreat, file a legal claim, file suit, implore, initiate a civil action, inntitute a legal proceeding, institute process, legally pursue, litigate against, make appeal to, orare, petition, plead, preeer a claim, press a claim, pursue a claim, put on trial, seek by request, supplicate, take to court
Associated concepts: power to sue, right to sue, standing to sue
Foreign phrases: Nemo alieno nomine lege agere potest.No one can sue in the name of another.
See also: appeal, call, charge, claim, complain, demand, importune, litigate, prosecute

TO SUE. To prosecute or commence legal proceedings for the purpose of recovering a right.

References in periodicals archive ?
Sue has been active in the community for many years, serving on a number of boards and organizations, including Mission Services of London, the St.
My Name Is Sue is at Chapter Arts Centre, Cardiff on July 20.
We borrowed flowers from other wards, it was like a little chapel," Sue said.
Sue is supporting Breakthrough Breast Cancer Scotland's One Day campaign, where people are being asked to help raise pounds 2200 - the cost of funding one day's research work.
When Sue was born in Owsley County, in 1967, most families lived like hers--up a holler, piecing together work through manual labor and growing most of the food they needed to eat.
Sue has worked tirelessly as a RCM rep for her colleagues".
Sue refused to leave her bedroom, forcing the removal men to pack up her things.
Sue turned to a Lighter Life weight loss programme, and though she says it wasn't cheap, it worked - the rapid weight loss meant she had to buy a complete new wardrobe.
After meeting Bob at Durham University, Sue worked briefly as a psychiatric social worker but gave up her career when the children came along, becoming drawn into the work of the parish.
However, largely due to extensive private-public promotional efforts, many State departments of transportation (DOTs) today use SUE routinely on Federal-aid highway and other major construction projects.
During a dive in the Dominican Republic in 1974, Sue learned about amber mines.