suffer


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Suffer

To admit, allow, or permit.

The term suffer is used to convey the idea of Acquiescence, passivity, indifference, or abstention from preventive action, as opposed to the taking of an affirmative step.

suffer

verb abide, accede, accept, allow, assent, authorize, be reconciled, be resigned, bear with, brook, comply, concede, consent, empower, give consent, give leave, give permission, grant, grant perrission, indulge, let, license, oblige, pati, permittere, put up with, sinere, tolerate

suffer

(Sustain loss), verb agonize, ail, anguish, be afflicted, be impaired, be injured, be racked, be stricken, be subjected to, be wounded, bear, endure, experience loss, feel pain, hurt, incur loss, languish, lose, minui, sacrifice, sustain damage
Associated concepts: suffer harm, suffer loss
See also: abide, acknowledge, allow, bear, consent, endure, forbear, languish, let, permit, recognize, sanction, tolerate, vouchsafe
References in periodicals archive ?
Does God suffer? The traditional answer is no, because God is immutable and impassible, and to suffer is to change or to be changed.
The more that people suffer or remember suffering, the more they experience deprivation or need.
Dupont and McGovern (1992) also claimed that the occurrence of suffering requires the individual's attribution of meaning to the threat, since without such attribution, although an individual may indeed feel pain, he will not suffer. Human suffering is inextricably associated with meaning imbued by the sufferer in his/her experience of suffering.
If I had not been willing to suffer Adam's actions and attitudes as I did, I wouldn't have had the opportunity to listen late one Wednesday night on the steps of our church building as with odd lucidness he articulated the pain he carried over being abandoned by his father.
They were also three times more likely to suffer complications like a blood clot and around eight times as likely to suffer high blood pressure.
2 : to suffer or cause to suffer from a lack of something other than food <The dog was starving for affection.>
Mexicans eat a lot of fat and suffer fewer heart attacks than us.
The following eight themes emerged from their narratives--preparing to suffer, normalizing their suffering, letting go and surrender, worshipping and reciting Scripture, fellowship and family support, experiencing God's presence, identification with the passion of the Christ and His disciples, and believing in a greater purpose.
It was also discovered that in the North East one in 10 people suffer from a condition such as diarrhoea or constipation before a big presentation and a fifth suffer before a job interview.
Problem: Many patients suffer needlessly because they are either too stoic to complain or they mistakenly fear addiction.
Alongside each of the artist's increasingly--and intentionally--tedious remembrances appeared another anonymous response to the question "When did you suffer most?" posed by the artist to friends and strangers.
To explore these gaps, I'll ponder a spiritual way of reading and responding that involves some extremely challenging--even radical--attitudes: the absolute relinquishing of control, the unconditional welcoming of the Other, the obliteration of the self, and the concomitant willingness to suffer.