suggestible


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Related to suggestible: dispirited, unhurried, venturesome
See: open, pliant
References in periodicals archive ?
"Weak and suggestible" doesn't fit wives like Sarah, who laughs at the notion of an octogenarian pregnancy even when predicted by a heavenly messenger.
Likewise, people with severe mental disorders may be suggestible to the creation of "false memories" during hypnotherapy, making the practice questionable in those cases.
If DID were simply a product of suggestions given to the suggestible, we would suspect that DID patients would readily accept suggestions toward the resolution of their conditions.
Victorian Clerkenwell housed an immense workforce, a shifting pool of the politically suggestible. While in London in 1902-03, Lenin printed his newspaper Iskra (Spark) at a press on Clerkenwell Green.
While such a misinterpretation is something that might be expected from a highly suggestible high school student, it is unconscionable coming from two employees of the American Bar Association.
The widespread use of "Caesarism" as a pejorative in the late 19th century was driven, Baehr shows, by fear of an irrational (and suggestible) mass electorate--a fear shared by liberals and conservatives alike.
suggestible, vulnerable to other shapes, hungry to be refilled by
A question that naturally arises is why some individuals are more suggestible than others - what factors account for individual differences in interrogative suggestibility?
After eight minutes or so of "you're getting very sleepy" the troublesome assumptions start tumbling into your suggestible psyche: "As you control your weight you are more in control of your life;" "All sexual activities are far more enjoyable now;" and, in a surprised voice, "You can buy clothes right off the shelf that flatter your new shape!"
Jennifer Phegley discusses how two Victorian literary magazines sought to disprove dominant cultural notions of women as undiscriminating, dangerously suggestible readers.
But such phenomena sure can suggest a lot, to the suggestible. About crop circles, for example--one of his biggest fascinations--he notes that "For every article or book I read that supported their validity, I found an equally convincing text or hoaxer's Web site that undermined such a perspective" and ultimately decided, hey, that's just the nature of the beast: "the [crop circles] offered instruction in how to work with paradox ...
GROUP PERIL Social psychology's pioneers, with few exceptions, believed that individuals lose their moral compass in groups and turn into "irrational, suggestible, and emotional brutes," Krueger and Funder argue.