suit

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Suit

A generic term, of comprehensive signification, referring to any proceeding by one person or persons against another or others in a court of law in which the plaintiff pursues the remedy that the law affords for the redress of an injury or the enforcement of a right, whether at law or in Equity.

suit

n. generic term for any filing of a complaint (or petition) asking for legal redress by judicial action, often called a "lawsuit." In common parlance a suit asking for a court order for action rather than a money judgment is often called a "petition," but technically it is a "suit in equity." (See: lawsuit)

suit

noun actio, action, action at law, action to serve justice, case, causa, cause, cause in court, judicial contest, lawsuit, legal action, legal proceeding, legal remedy, lis, petition, proceeding, suit in law, trial
Associated concepts: class suits, nonsuit, suit against state
Foreign phrases: Secta est pugna civilis; sicut actores arrantur actionibus, et, quasi, accinguntur gladiis, ita rei muniuntur exceptionibus, et defenduntur, quasi, clypeis.A suit is a civil battle; for as the plaintiffs are armed with actions, and, as it were, girded with swords, so the defendants are fortified with pleas, and are deeended, as it were, with shields. Frustra agit qui judiiium prosequi nequit cum effectu. He sues vainly who cannot prosecute his judgment with effect. Nemo alieno nomine lege agere potest. No one can sue in the name of another.
See also: accommodate, action, agree, appeal, calculate, call, case, cause, chain, claim, clothe, comply, comport, concur, conform, entreaty, fulfill, lawsuit, legal proceeding, matter, proceeding, prosecution, satisfy, trial

suit

a civil proceeding.

SUIT. An action. The word suit in the 25th section of the judiciary act of 1789, applies to any proceeding in a court of justice, in which the plaintiff pursues, in such court, the remedy which the law affords him. An application for a prohibition is therefore a suit. 2 Pet. 449. According to the code of practice of Louisiana, art. 96, a suit is a real, personal or mixed demand, made before a competent judge, by which the parties pray to obtain their rights, and a decision of their disputes. In that acceptation, the words suit, process and cause, are in that state almost synonymous. Vide Secta, and Steph. Pl. 427; 3 Bl. Com. 395; Gilb. C. P. 48; 1 Chit. Pl. 399; Wood's Civ. Law, b. 4, c. p. 315; 4 Mass. 263; 18 John. 14; 4 Watts, R. 154; 3 Story, Const. Sec. 1719. In its most extended sense, the word suit, includes not only a civil action, but also a criminal prosecution, as indictment, information, and a conviction by a magistrate. Ham. N. P. 270.

References in classic literature ?
"I should say that a walking suit in which one could not walk, and a winter suit which exposes the throat, head, and feet to cold and damp, was rather a failure, Clara, especially as it has no beauty to reconcile one to its utter unfitness," said Dr.
"Thank Heaven!" and she resigned herself with a sigh of relief, adding plaintively, "I did hope you'd accept my suit, for poor Rose has been afflicted with frightful clothes long enough to spoil the taste of any girl."
The whole suit is as light as a cobweb; one might fancy one has nothing at all on, when dressed in it; that, however, is the great virtue of this delicate cloth."
"If your Imperial Majesty will be graciously pleased to take off your clothes, we will fit on the new suit, in front of the looking glass."
But it wants only two days to the fete ; I received the invitation yesterday; made Mouston post hither with my wardrobe, and only this morning discovered my misfortune; and from now till the day after to- morrow, there isn't a single fashionable tailor who will undertake to make me a suit."
The suit destined to grace his approaching nuptials being now selected, he replaced the others with no less care than he had displayed in drawing them from the musty nooks where they had silently reposed for many years.
In the hope of pleasing everyone, she took everyone's advice, and like the old man and his donkey in the fable suited nobody.
Meg admired the tragedy, so Jo piled up the agony to suit her, while Amy objected to the fun, and, with the best intentions in life, Jo quenched the spritly scenes which relieved the somber character of the story.
"Is that any good reason why he should poke her new suit into the kitchen stove?
"Yes, indeed you must; it would suit you--in your black dress, now," said Celia, insistingly.
"Souls have complexions too: what will suit one will not suit another."
Don Quixote went over and unhooked Sancho, who, as soon as he found himself on the ground, looked at the rent in his huntingcoat and was grieved to the heart, for he thought he had got a patrimonial estate in that suit.