superior

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Superior

One who has a right to give orders; belonging to a higher grade.

A superior is someone or something entitled to command, influence, or control. In the judicial system, a superior court has general or extensive jurisdiction, as opposed to an inferior court. A superior court bears a different meaning in different states. In some states, it is a tribunal of intermediate jurisdiction between the trial courts and the chief appellate court; in other states, however, it is the name given to trial courts.

In the law of Negligence, a superior force is an uncontrollable and irresistible force that produces results that could not be avoided.

In real property, a holder of a superior estate has an Easement, or a nonpossessory interest in land, in an inferior estate.

superior

(Excellent), adjective above average, above par, better, choice, deluxe, distinguished, exceptional, finer, first-rate, foremost, greater, high-class, high-grade, illustrious, incomparable, matchless, melior, noble, nonpareil, peerless, praestantior, preferable, preferred, seccnd to none, superexcellent, superlative, supreme, topping, transcendent, unequaled, unexcelled, unparalleled, unrivalled, unsurpassed

superior

(Higher), adjective chief, greater, more eleeated, of greater influence, of higher rank, paramount, senior
Associated concepts: respondeat superior, superior court, superior force
See also: absolute, ascendant, best, chief, director, disdainful, dominant, employer, ideal, important, inflated, irresistible, meritorious, notable, outstanding, paramount, predominant, preferable, preferential, premium, prime, principal, prior, professional, prominent, select, special, stellar, sterling, superlative, unapproachable, valuable

superior

in feudal law, the person from whom a person lower in the feudal chain holds his land.

SUPERIOR. One who has a right to command; one who holds a superior rank; as, a soldier is bound to obey his superior.
     2. In estates, some are superior to others; an estate entitled to a servitude or easement over another estate, is called the superior or dominant, and the other the inferior or servient estate. 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 1612.
     3. Of courts, some are supreme or superior, possessing in general appellate jurisdiction, either by writ of error or by appeal; 3 Bouv. Inst. n. 2527; the others are called inferior courts.

References in classic literature ?
These reports charmed us, because they flattered our desires; but our superiors finding nothing in all this talk that could be depended on, were in suspense what directions to give us, till my companion and I upon this reflection, that since all the ways were equally new to us, we had nothing to do but to resign ourselves to the Providence of God, asked and obtained the permission of our superiors to attempt the road through Melinda.
I repeat, our romantics, frequently, become such accomplished rascals (I use the term "rascals" affectionately), suddenly display such a sense of reality and practical knowledge that their bewildered superiors and the public generally can only ejaculate in amazement.
With the curate of Montdidier and the superior of the Jesuits of Amiens.
He was a man of twenty-five or twenty-six years of age, of unprepossessing countenance, obsequious to his superiors, insolent to his subordinates; and this, in addition to his position as responsible agent on board, which is always obnoxious to the sailors, made him as much disliked by the crew as Edmond Dantes was beloved by them.
I am sure that your official superiors do not need to be convinced of your diligence!
Raoul didn't wait to be told twice; he knew that with superiors, especially when those superiors are princes, the highest politeness is to obey without delay or argument; he went down to the stables, picked out a pie-bald Andalusian horse, saddled and bridled it himself, for Athos had advised him to trust no one with those important offices at a time of danger, and went to rejoin the prince, who at that moment mounted his horse.
Little did she understand human nature, for the nouveaux riches, who are as certain to succeed an old and displaced class of superiors, as hungry flies to follow flies with full bellies, would have been much more apt to run into extravagance and folly, than persons always accustomed to money, and who did not depend on its exhibition for their importance.
The daughter of a minister of the church can have no superiors.
A look of severity, or harshness even, a sort of stiffness, which, with inferiors, was pride, with superiors an affectation of superior virtue; a surly cast of countenance upon all occasions, even when looking at himself in a glass alone -- such is the exterior of this personage.
Offeecially, I am debarred from criticizing any action of superiors.
We must feel that every addition to your father's society, among his equals or superiors, may be of use in diverting his thoughts from those who are beneath him.
Again, in their superiors, it quencheth jealousy towards them, as persons that they think they may, at pleasure, despise: and it layeth their competitors and emulators asleep; as never believing they should be in possibility of advancement, till they see them in possession.