References in classic literature ?
We may suppose that only one (F), of the two species which were least closely related to the other nine original species, has transmitted descendants to this late stage of descent.
There is no reason--so Watson argues--to suppose that their knowledge IS anything beyond the habits shown in this behaviour: the inference that other people have something nonphysical called "mind" or "thought" is therefore unwarranted.
I only mean that I suppose, from your manner of speaking, it must be the same to Miss Morton whether she marry Edward or Robert.
I was disposed straightway to search for other truths and when I had represented to myself the object of the geometers, which I conceived to be a continuous body or a space indefinitely extended in length, breadth, and height or depth, divisible into divers parts which admit of different figures and sizes, and of being moved or transposed in all manner of ways(for all this the geometers suppose to be in the object they contemplate), I went over some of their simplest demonstrations.
But if some one who would rather not admit the immortality of the soul boldly denies this, and says that the dying do really become more evil and unrighteous, then, if the speaker is right, I suppose that injustice, like disease, must be assumed to be fatal to the unjust, and that those who take this disorder die by the natural inherent power of destruction which evil has, and which kills them sooner or later, but in quite another way from that in which, at present, the wicked receive death at the hands of others as the penalty of their deeds?
And since you seem to want her, I suppose I'm willing--or have to be.
Then, after that, suppose we put in some of these coloured pebbles--just to mark the divisions between the different kinds of flowers, you know.
It is to be hoped so, I suppose, for his chances of comfort in another world are very small.
Suppose 'm you big fella white marster give 'm me one fella stick, close up me washee- washee you that fella steamer.
Tyrrel was wrong to let her temper get the better of her, and to suppose herself insulted where no insult was intended.
Besides, could we suppose a set of people to live separate from each other, but within such a distance as would admit of an intercourse, and that there were laws subsisting between each party, to prevent their injuring one another in their mutual dealings, supposing one a carpenter, another a husbandman, shoemaker, and the like, and that their numbers were ten thousand, still all that they would have together in common would be a tariff for trade, or an alliance for mutual defence, but not the same city.