Survey

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SURVEY, The act by which the quantity of a piece of land is ascertained; the paper containing a statement of the courses, distances, and quantity of land, is also called a survey.
     2. A survey made by authority of law and duly returned into the land office, is a matter of record, and of equal dignity with the patent. 3 Marsh. 226; 2 J. J. Marsh, 160. See 3 Greenleaf, 126; 5 Greenleaf, 24; 14 Mass. 149 1 Harr. & John. 20 1 1 Overt. 199; 1 Dev. & Bat. 76.
     3. By survey is also understood an examination; as, a survey has been made of your house, and now the insurance company will insure it.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
SRQ touts 100 years of history providing engineering and surveying services to municipalities and infrastructure development along the Highway 11 corridor.
There are some benefits that can be gained by letting an outside organization do the surveying for the foundry, but that's not the important consideration.
I found the model and case in Chapter 2 and the information on the role of surveys in transforming culture in Chapter 3 particularly interesting since they closely mirror some of our experiences with surveying, measuring, and adapting to change.
The reason for surveying downtown, urban residential, and suburban sites was to compare the lifespan of trees based on the harshness of their growing spaces.
Toward confirming this, the agency will be surveying homes in another seven states next year.
If a mine is discovered, the new wealth produced from it can be worth as much as $250 for each $1 of geoscience surveying."
Facilities can expect an increase in evening and weekend surveys, more rapid imposition of civil penalties, and stern warnings to state surveying agencies that if they don't perform their duties properly, they might be replaced by more energetic monitors.
A Navy spokesperson says the Navy is not unconcerned with university data, but he doubts that it's a significant problem, because academic Seabeam vessels are not surveying large areas and the data collected are not published in their entirety.