swear

(redirected from swearer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to swearer: swearing, Sweaters

swear

v. 1) to declare under oath that one will tell the truth (sometimes "the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth"). Failure to tell the truth, and do so knowingly, is the crime of perjury. 2) to administer an oath to a witness that he/she will tell the truth, which is done by a notary public, a court clerk, a court reporter, or anyone authorized by law to administer oaths. 3) to install into office by administering an oath. 4) to use profanity. (See: oath, perjury, notary public)

swear

to take an oath.

TO SWEAR. To take an oath, judicially administered. Vide Affirmation; Oath.
     2. To swear also signifies to use such profane language as is forbidden by law. This is generally punished by statutory provisions in the several states.

References in periodicals archive ?
Theravada consecration ceremony is, to a great extent, a ritual for blessing the statues of the Buddha through mimetic reenactment of events from the life of the Buddha (Swearer, 2004:79) such as the Sujata's offering of sweetened milk-dish after his six-year penance, the night on the eve of enlightenment, the actual enlightenment, and the place of enlightenment through offering of a milk-dish, covering the eyes of the statues with beeswax, subsequently clearing the beeswax, and constructing the space of enlightenment (bodhimanda) respectively.
Swearer (Eds.) Bullying in American Schools: A Social-Ecological Perspective on Prevention and Intervention.
An example of verbal bullying, also referred to as psychological bullying or relational aggression (Espelage & Swearer, 2003), may be seen when a gift reports that another gift is not talking to her and is encouraging everyone else to do the same.
While this citation does not describe in any detail what the gallant service Swearer rendered was, future citations would include more descriptions of the actions taken.
Self-report questionnaires have been the most used and preferred method of investigating peer abuse (Espelage & Swearer, 2003; Warden, Cheyne, Christie, Fitzpatrick, & Reid, 2003).
Swearer welcomes the new work as part of what he sees as a changing view of fish youth.
Adams (603) 598-2806; johnmrwillie@aol.com USS Swearer DE186: Walter Roberge, Jr.
Americans, too, have promoted their own form of socially engaged Buddhism, through the work of pioneers like poet Gary Snyder, author Joanne Macy and Swarthmore Professor of Religion Donald Swearer.
The epilogue by Donald Swearer reflects on worldview and practice, symbols and stories, inner peace and world peace, and the paradox of weakness and strength.
"The basic paradigm didn't make sense to me," says biology graduate student Stephen Swearer of the University of California at Santa Barbara.
Swearer analyzed the sagittae of fish collected daily between 1985-1987, and E.
The blast rankled many in higher education, none more than Howard Swearer, president of Brown University in Rhode Island.