swear

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swear

v. 1) to declare under oath that one will tell the truth (sometimes "the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth"). Failure to tell the truth, and do so knowingly, is the crime of perjury. 2) to administer an oath to a witness that he/she will tell the truth, which is done by a notary public, a court clerk, a court reporter, or anyone authorized by law to administer oaths. 3) to install into office by administering an oath. 4) to use profanity. (See: oath, perjury, notary public)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

swear

to take an oath.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

TO SWEAR. To take an oath, judicially administered. Vide Affirmation; Oath.
     2. To swear also signifies to use such profane language as is forbidden by law. This is generally punished by statutory provisions in the several states.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
AMs do, however, insist that we shouldn't refer to these periods of inactivity as holidays, swearing blind that much of the time is used to undertake "constituency business".
A cleverer man would not have sat in front of ITN's Trevor McDonald the other night swearing blind he'd been misquoted when we all knew his comments had been printed verbatim.
Being an MP is one of the best-paid jobs going, yet no qualifications are necessary - other than swearing blind allegiance to a political party and the "Establishment" - the latter requiring total commitment since it controls the thoughts, words and deeds of those who make up its forces because it hold the nation's purse-strings.