swear

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swear

v. 1) to declare under oath that one will tell the truth (sometimes "the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth"). Failure to tell the truth, and do so knowingly, is the crime of perjury. 2) to administer an oath to a witness that he/she will tell the truth, which is done by a notary public, a court clerk, a court reporter, or anyone authorized by law to administer oaths. 3) to install into office by administering an oath. 4) to use profanity. (See: oath, perjury, notary public)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

swear

to take an oath.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

TO SWEAR. To take an oath, judicially administered. Vide Affirmation; Oath.
     2. To swear also signifies to use such profane language as is forbidden by law. This is generally punished by statutory provisions in the several states.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
Companies may be selling off their private jets, but they're not swearing off private jet rides.
Is the timing of the article off, with Obama and Clinton, and some of Republican candidates, swearing off negative campaigning?
* New Hampshire Republicans calling for an end to straight-ticket voting is like the alcoholic who finally hits bottom swearing off booze.
Swearing off government funds is the only way to maintain freedom from the government's leash.
Lucy Moll, author of Energy Eating the Vegetarian Way and former executive editor of Vegetarian Times, points out that for many people who fall into this group, or are swearing off animal protein for health reasons, fake meats may make the transition easier.