swear

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swear

v. 1) to declare under oath that one will tell the truth (sometimes "the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth"). Failure to tell the truth, and do so knowingly, is the crime of perjury. 2) to administer an oath to a witness that he/she will tell the truth, which is done by a notary public, a court clerk, a court reporter, or anyone authorized by law to administer oaths. 3) to install into office by administering an oath. 4) to use profanity. (See: oath, perjury, notary public)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

swear

to take an oath.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

TO SWEAR. To take an oath, judicially administered. Vide Affirmation; Oath.
     2. To swear also signifies to use such profane language as is forbidden by law. This is generally punished by statutory provisions in the several states.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
"People who swear at each other are less likely to use actual physical violence," Byrne says.
"If you hand someone an icecold glass of water they will hold on to it for longer if they swear.
He stated that the officers still swear to obey their army commanders, and since the president is the supreme commander of the armed forces, then the oath dictates they obey him as well.
If you really wanted to shame him into trying not to swear, tape him and play it back.
The research surveyed 2,241 people and found that nine out of 10 parents have heard their children swear and only 34% of parents punished their children for their bad language.
My last good swear was on Sunday, when I read that John Dunford, general secretary of the Secondary Heads' Association, was suggesting live football should be screened after the 9pm watershed to prevent children lip-reading the fruity language of potty-mouthed players.
They argued that, while the swear words ``might be regarded as extreme in polite conversation'', they were ``common currency'' in that business.
It is significant that Hamlet swears revenge in soliloquy; his oath is not public, nor does it ever become so.
Dina Alian, an Egyptian school teacher, said: "Of course I'll get offended if someone swears at or around me because it shows lack of ethics and respect [towards] others."
When the students take charge of camcorders, we see that the law of the playground is to swear loudly and often.
There are exceptions: you're not allowed to use bad words when you're on telly, and I never swear at anyone in the service industry, on the grounds that they have a hard enough time already without some rude git effing at them.
I played in the non-League with dockers who every other word was a swear word.