swindler


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Related to swindler: Gypsy, Bernie Madoff
See: criminal, delinquent, embezzler, outlaw, thief

SWINDLER, criminal law. A cheat; one guilty of defrauding divers persons. 1 Term Rep. 748; 2 H. Blackst. 531; Stark. on Sland. 135.
     2. Swindling is usually applied to a transaction, where the guilty party procures the delivery to him, under a pretended contract, of the personal property of another, with the felonious design of appropriating it to his own use. 2 Russell on Crimes, 130; Alison, Prine. Cr. Law of Scotland, 250; Mass. 406.

References in periodicals archive ?
What most of us cannot understand is why swindlers using the Ponzi game of promising unusually high interest can still attract investors with sweet talk by agents who are grade and high school dropouts.
All other swindlers upon earth are nothing to the self-swindlers, and with such pretences did I cheat myself.
The swindler later called the victim informing him of the good news that the company sponsoring the prize had increased it to Dh700,000 -- with one catch.
Swindler, who began her career at the Holocaust Memorial Center as an intern five years ago, also currently serves as the organization's social media and web master, database manager and internship coordinator.
Back on the loose: Swindler Paul Bint is snapped on the street after being freed from prison
RUINED Wall Street swindler Bernie Madoff used money stolen from investors to buy houses, boats and a share of a jet.
WALL Street swindler Bernie Madoff is worth EUR823million (pounds 584million), his lawyers have told a New York court.
A note attached read: "Bernie the Swindler, Lesson: Return stolen property to rightful owners.
However, the original meaning of the German noun Schwindler -- the source of our word swindler -- was "giddy person.
A HIGH-class swindler was set to be sentenced today for a fraud in which she bounced cheques worth around pounds 2m on some of Europe's top auction houses.
In a typical case, a swindler poses as a relative of a fraud target and asks the target to remit money that the swindler says over the phone is needed for him to get out of trouble.
Stanley and Tamra Russ bought the house from Jeffrey and Janice Swindler.