Syllabus

(redirected from syllabuses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to syllabuses: syllabi

Syllabus

A headnote; a short note preceding the text of a reported case that briefly summarizes the rulings of the court on the points decided in the case.

The syllabus appears before the text of the opinion. The syllabus generally is not part of the opinion of the court but is prepared by a legal editor employed by a private law book company that publishes court decisions to serve as a quick reference for a researcher. Some courts prepare the syllabus for their own decisions, but in many states the syllabus has no legal effect. Ohio is one exception, however, where the court-prepared syllabus is part of the decision and is considered a statement of the law. In most states, only the opinion of the court containing the original statement of the grounds for the opinion may be used in legal papers in a lawsuit to convince a court or jury of a particular point of law.

Cross-references

Court Opinion.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the second area in which the procedural and task syllabuses differ.
The advocates of task syllabuses, however, have some more objective criteria in determining task difficulty.
The third difference between the procedural and task syllabuses concerns how the tasks are implemented in each lesson.
The very last point mentioned in the previous heading, that is, form-focused instruction, brings us to the last difference between procedural and task syllabuses. In Prabhu's methodology, negative evidence seems to have no role in the process of language learning.
Table 1 summarizes the differences between these two syllabuses.
As night follows day, History syllabuses which are `high political' and `modular' foster textbooks in their own image.
They therefore avoid innovative syllabuses. Educational publishing, which is now big business, seeks speedy profits from large print-runs -- hence the present depressing proliferation of titles on a handful of popular modules.
And it alone was responsible for approving the syllabuses drafted by the Examining Groups.