sympathetic

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The court passed the order after counsel Lalit Bhasin, appearing for the national carrier, said that he is sticking to the stand taken by the management to consider the reinstatement issue sympathetically but the statement was not appreciated in the proper spirit.
Grace Palladino presents the history of the crafts unions sympathetically while also posing gently some questions regarding their positions on race, gender, and other social issues.
As today's report makes clear, the EU would be viewed more sympathetically if it kept to its original purpose - an economic trading unit
We asked Tesco to reconsider and were told: "We regret not handling this claim as sympathetically as we should have.
We're dealing with the situation as sympathetically as we can.
With ``Letters From Iwo Jima,'' Eastwood has attempted a rare thing -- sympathetically, with clear eyes, telling a war story from the point of view of a one-time enemy -- and accomplished something absolutely historic, namely, making two films in the same year about one battle, providing us with an all-encompassing view of the tragic waste of war.
It is calling on schools to offer a support network for students when results are revealed on Thursday and on parents to act sympathetically.
Betsky sympathetically elicits responses from the architects.
It is the truth that makes us free, not feeling good or receiving a standing ovation or having one's plight sympathetically reported in the local newspaper.
He understands sympathetically the social milieu that surrounds the Rio Grande.
They will deal with claims as sympathetically as they possibly can," Tarling said.
In the years that followed, the director dealt sympathetically with labor unions (Matewan, released in '87), citizens caught in the middle of pitched battles over gentrification (City of Hope, '91), race and substance abuse (Passion Fish, '92), and small-town corruption in the shadow of the Mexican border (Lone Star, '96).