syncretize


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
References in periodicals archive ?
A language representing this lexicalization type has one marker that syncretizes the notions of Location and Source, and a separate marker to express Goal.
Christian and African spiritual beliefs often syncretize in some denominations and, just as in colonial times, devout Rastafarians yearn to rejoin the spiritual land of their ancestors.
Part of the church's "catholicity" resides in the fact that it is able to syncretize elements of various cultures and religious traditions, whereas evangelical Protestantism tends to defend the purity of the faith.
The "self" culture may demonize another culture, identify its various characteristics with facets of another, and/or syncretize aspects of the two.
They noted that the Ancestors had to syncretize to prevent being massacred, but this practice was deemed disrespectful of the African origins and that they would no longer hide behind Catholicism.
Maori Christian faiths syncretize Christian tenets with precolonial Maori beliefs.
Many Africans also practice African religions, and some of these adherents syncretize their practices alongside Christianity or Islam (Chavis Butler, 1994; Mazrui, 1986).
He is a baptized Catholic with a faith that syncretizes Jesus, the Virgin Mary, and the Pachamama (Mother Nature) of the Bolivian people.
By situating a key myth of the Western tradition among the Cholos of Boyle Heights, Los Angeles, Electricidad challenges the common association of Greek and Roman antiquity with the European elite and offers instead a diverse production that syncretizes aspects of Aztec, Latino, Cholo, and mainstream U.
32 and Ficino's commentaries on Plato's Symposium and Phaedrus, he details the dynamics of an artistic creativity that syncretizes Neoplatonic epistemology with Pleiade prescriptions of poetic practice.
Shakespeare repeatedly syncretizes an array of biblical and pagan sources within The Tempest.
Further, Julian syncretizes Greek, Egyptian, and Persian myths so that Helios (an amalgam of Zeus, the Egyptian god Serapis, and the Persian god Mithras) and Attis (an amalgam of Mithras and Persephone) take on manifold significance.