tale


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See: falsehood, myth, narration, narrative, story

TALE, comm. law. A denomination of money in China. In the computation of the ad valorem duty on goods, &c. it is computed at one dollar and forty-eight cents. Act of March 2, 1799, s. 61, 1 Sto. L. U. S. 626. Vide Foreign Coins.

TALE, Eng. law. The declaration or count was anciently so called in law pleadings. 3 Bl. Com. 293.

References in classic literature ?
There were certain tales which all minstrels had to know, and the best among them could tell three hundred and fifty.
At length, after many years had passed, men began to write down these tales, so that they might not be forgotten.
From first to last Hermann's niece utters no word in the tale -- and it is not because she is dumb, but for the simple reason that whenever she happens to come under the observation of the narrator she has either no occasion or is too profoundly moved to speak.
I had just finished writing "The End of the Tether" and was casting about for some subject which could be developed in a shorter form than the tales in the volume of "Youth" when the instance of a steamship full of returning coolies from Singapore to some port in northern China occurred to my recollection.
That was no fairy tale, 'tis true," said old Nanny; "but now it's coming.
You have had a good sleep while I have been sitting here, and arguing with him whether it was a story or a fairy tale.
Next morning, therefore, the Knight begins the series of tales and the others follow in order.
His mind and eye were keen, besides, for moral qualities; he penetrated directly through all the pretenses of falsehood and hypocrisy; while how thoroughly he understood and respected honest worth appears in the picture of the Poor Parson in the Prolog to 'The Canterbury Tales.
There you are right, he replied; but if any one asks where are such models to be found and of what tales are you speaking-- how shall we answer him?
I said to him, You and I, Adeimantus, at this moment are not poets, but founders of a State: now the founders of a State ought to know the general forms in which poets should cast their tales, and the limits which must be observed by them, but to make the tales is not their business.
But the peculiar tale of this nature to which the author of Ivanhoe has to acknowledge an obligation, is more ancient by two centuries than any of these last mentioned.
No tales and poems were ever produced at a greater cost of brain and spirit.