tales


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Related to tales: Thales, Pitagoras

tales

a group of persons summoned from among those present in court or from bystanders to fill vacancies on a jury panel, or the writ summoning such jurors.

TALES, Eng. law. The name of a book kept in the king's bench office, of such jurymen as were of the tales. See Tales de circumstantibus.

References in classic literature ?
Yet the old time fairy tale, having served for generations, may now be classed as "historical" in the children's library; for the time has come for a series of newer "wonder tales" in which the stereotyped genie, dwarf and fairy are eliminated, together with all the horrible and blood-curdling incidents devised by their authors to point a fearsome moral to each tale.
"Heart" was intended for a much longer tale, and is unavoidably incomplete; but it is unnecessary to point out defects that even the juvenile reader will soon detect.
Then as he changed, the tales he listened to changed too.
"Falk" shares with one other of my stories ("The Return" in the "Tales of Unrest" volume) the distinction of never having been serialized.
No tales and poems were ever produced at a greater cost of brain and spirit.
"Yes, but such tales and stories are good for nothing.
The great work of the period, however, and the crowning achievement of Chaucer's life, is 'The Canterbury Tales.' Every one is familiar with the plan of the story (which may well have had some basis in fact): how Chaucer finds himself one April evening with thirty other men and women, all gathered at the Tabard Inn in Southwark (a suburb of London and just across the Thames from the city proper), ready to start next morning, as thousands of Englishmen did every year, on a pilgrimage to the shrine of St.
But the narrative of Hephaestus binding Here his mother, or how on another occasion Zeus sent him flying for taking her part when she was being beaten, and all the battles of the gods in Homer--these tales must not be admitted into our State, whether they are supposed to have an allegorical meaning or not.
In the Sketches from Memory Hawthorne gives an intimation of the tale which he might write and did afterward write of The Great Carbuncle.
From thence it has been transferred by the Reverend Charles Henry Hartsborne, M.A., editor of a very curious volume, entitled ``Ancient Metrical Tales, printed chiefly from original sources, 1829.'' Mr Hartshorne gives no other authority for the present fragment, except the article in the Bibliographer, where it is entitled the Kyng and the Hermite.
Nay, I do not know all the tale; there was a woman in it.
No--that is a thought which comes later; in the beginning he is only proposing to tell a little tale, a very little tale, a six-page tale.