tax

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tax

n. a governmental assessment (charge) upon property value, transactions (transfers and sales), licenses granting a right, and/or income. These include Federal and state income taxes, county and city taxes on real property, state and/or local sales tax based on a percentage of each retail transaction, duties on imports from foreign countries, business licenses, Federal tax (and some states' taxes) on the estates of persons who have died, taxes on large gifts, and a state "use" tax in lieu of sales tax imposed on certain goods bought outside of the state. (See: income tax, estate tax, gift tax, use tax, unified estate and gift tax, franchise tax)

tax

a levy made by national or local government to pay for services provided by public bodies. There is no inherent power in the Crown to raise money in this way; express provision must be made by statute. Changes to tax law are made annually in the Finance Act(s); periodically the law is consolidated, as for example in the Income and Corporation Taxes Act 1988 or the Taxation of Chargeable Gains Act 1992. See TAXATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Well, this may be a level playing field - for the taxer. The government gets its tax no matter what.
Tax cutters fall along a continuum, from pure flat taxers and national sales taxers to corporate types who lobby for special rates, credits, and exemptions.
While it's difficult to see how the BBA could constrain these resourceful spenders and taxers, the public flogging of the proposal has restored my faith.
As a result, the Republican Party defined Democrats for workers and for everybody out there as taxers and spenders.
What better person to symbolize the party of taxers and spenders than an old-time pol who protests against budget and tax cuts?
Socialists, anarchists, labor unionists, single taxers, the organizers of the city's new associations for racial justice--all got a hearing and a vigorous, multisided argument.
As McIntyre put it, the flat taxers aim to "consolidate the tax dodges for corporations and the wealthy into one all-encompassing loophole."
This fundamental problem is not solved by adding back a few of the deductions that Armey would repeal, as some flat taxers propose.