tempestuous


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tempestuous

adjective angry, disgusted, enraged, frantic, frenzied, fuming, furious, hostile, inflamed, ireful, livid, offended, offensive, outraged, raging, storming, tumultuous, turbulent
See also: disorderly, outrageous, severe, vehement
References in periodicals archive ?
"The collection is called 'A Tempestuous Affaire' and is inspired from a piece of emerald.
The 20-year-old from Leicestershire, was the third contestant to leave the seventh series of the reality TV show, after a tempestuous first week saw Shahbaz walk out and Dawn ejected for breaking the rules.
Before Evita there was Manuelita, the tempestuous mistress of Latin America's greatest hero, Simon Bolivar.
Since those tempestuous times, Smiley has forged a miniconglomerate, The Smiley Group, and become the first African American to host his own show on National Public Radio.
As whirlwinds of painted and drawn pattern--the surfaces depicted include wallpaper, flooring, and upholstery--jumbled with hard-edged swatches of poured color, they negotiated a tempestuous push-pull, becoming a sort of manic, quasi-illusionist take on Frank Stella's late '60s abstractions.
In Soto's repeated rounds of pas de deux with each dancer--the tender Kistler draped herself around him, the tempestuous Weese engaged in a physical tug of war, and the sensual Sylve stretched and contorted her body provocatively--nothing developed.
That adage "What's done in the dark will come to light" boldly applies to Pete's tempestuous and sexually charged new book.
Previously described as storms in a teacup and a rice bowl, a more tempestuous tariff war seems likely between Kenya and Pakistan, and it is already had a serious effect on Kenya's export tea sales.
The Office, though, is my rock in the tempestuous sea of life, a place to rest when I feel like I'm drowning or to warm myself on a sunny day.
At the heart of the novel is Anne's tempestuous and forbidden relationship with King Edward IV.
The climactic scene, in which Benoit rides in a sleigh with his drunken uncle and the body of a dead youth, resonates with Canadian cultural mythology, the snowstorm an indication of the tempestuous winds of change about to come.
Using interviews with 421 girls of vastly different socio-economic, racial, and geographical backgrounds, Brown analyzes the phenomenon of "girlfighting." She criticizes previous studies of this problem because of their tendency to view the sometimes tempestuous relationships between girls strictly on the psychological level, ignoring the social and political constructs that influence and reinforce such behaviors.