Joint

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Joint

United; coupled together in interest; shared between two or more persons; not solitary in interest or action but acting together or in unison. A combined, undivided effort or undertaking involving two or more individuals. Produced by or involving the concurring action of two or more; united in or possessing a common relation, action, or interest. To share common rights, duties, and liabilities.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

joint

adj., adv. referring to property, rights or obligations which are united, undivided and shared by two or more persons or entities. Thus, a joint property held by both cannot be effectively transferred unless all owners join in the transaction. If a creditor sues to collect a joint debt, he/she must include all the debtors in the lawsuit, unless the debt is specifically "joint and several," meaning anyone of the debtors may be individually liable. Therefore, care must be taken in drafting deeds, sales agreements, promissory notes, joint venture agreements, and other documents. A joint tenancy is treated specially, since it includes the right of the survivor to get the entire property when the other dies (right of survivorship). (See: joint tenancy, joint and several, joint venture, tenancy in common)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

JOINT. United, not separate; as, joint action, or one which is brought by several persons acting together; joint bond, a bond given by two or more obligors.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
The temporomandibular joint is a complex type of articulation that is formed from the articular surfaces of the temporal bone and mandibular condyle.
Discomalleolar and anterior malleolar ligaments: possible causes of middle ear damage during temporomandibular joint surgery.
In these cases, a preprosthetic treatment, with the goal of eliminating headaches, restoring balanced muscle tone, and establishing appropriate relations in the temporomandibular joints (TMJ), seems reasonable [3, 4].
Naeije, "Anterior disc displacement with reduction and symptomatic hypermobility in the human temporomandibular joint: prevalence rates and risk factors in children and teenagers," Journal of Orofacial Pain, vol.
Cornelius, "The use of TMJ Concepts prostheses to reconstruct patients with major temporomandibular joint and mandibular defects," International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, vol.
Comparison of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of temporomandibular joint disc displacement.

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