fate

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Related to the Fates: Moirai, The Muses, The Furies

fate

(Destiny), noun certainty, destination, destined lot, fate-to-be-predetermined events, fortune, future, future course of events, future state, inevitability, inevitableness, lot, luck, outcome, power to predetermine events, predetermination, sureness, ultimate future, what is destined to happen, what is doomed to occur, what is fated to occur, what is written, what looms
Associated concepts: fortuitous event, insurance, the defennant's fate is with the jury
Foreign phrases: Fatum.Fate.

fate

(Termination), noun apocalypse, bad luck, bane, bitter end, catastrophe, collapse, conclusion, curtain, death, death knell, death warrant, deathblow, debacle, destruction, disaster, doom, downfall, end, end of the world, final blow, final event, final curtain, final result, finis, finish, ill luck, last act, misfortune, payoff, ruin, ruination, terminus, tough luck, undoing, windup
See also: accident, end, happenstance, outlook, predetermination, predetermine, prospect, quirk, termination
References in periodicals archive ?
Rgk can imply ' authority,' but it can also imply 'fate.' The rpk, the course of happenings that develop under the gods' control, becomes a destiny--ragnarqk ['the fate of the powers']--that carries them with it.
The Fates hope Eve, with her unusual talents will be successful is catching the Nix.
Later, Beldade considered just how tightly the fates of all those spots are coupled.
While the concept of destiny or fate (moira) came to signify an ominous power, personified as "the Fates" to whom even the Olympians were subject, moira in its more original sense denotes simply the "lot, portion, share which falls to one" in the distribution of booty, in inheritance, etc.
(12) In Greek and Roman mythology, destiny is described variously as a transcendent force of necessity or a personification of this principle in the form of the moirai/parcae, the Fates. Fate orders the universe such that preset occurances necessarily follow each other in an inexorable, if seemingly inexplicable, continuum.
Hesiod was the first to personify the Fates as three very old women who spin the threads of human destiny.