Marshalsea

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Marshalsea

historically a court held before the knight marshal, abolished 1849.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

MARSHALSEA, English law. The name of a prison belonging to the court of the king's bench.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
She suffers throughout all the years of the Marshalsea, becoming a "fountain of love and fidelity" to her family and to others about her, like the mentally disabled and penniless Maggy and the destitute old pensioner, Nandy (192).
on the green earth"; (24) in Little Dorrit (1855-1857), the narrator's repeated references to Judgment that accompany Arthur Clennam's penitential growth in the Marshalsea prison; in Villette (1853), Lucy Snowe's desperate search for consolation that leads her to dabble in Catholic practices like confession and to consider the allure of purgatory.
For Charles, this occurred at age 12 when his father was arrested for debt and sentenced to the Marshalsea, an ancient for-profit prison where debtors were forced to pay for their own stay while gathering resources through day jobs, family, and friends to pay down their debt.
See also The Case of the Marshalsea (1612) 10 Co Rep 68b, 73a; 77 ER 1027, 1033 (Coke CJ).
It is appropriately on his return to Rome that the two realities of his rich new life and his past in the Marshalsea merge for the self-deluded Mr.
Just for the fun of it Googling a runner Amy Dorrit 3.25 Salisbury The central character in Charles Dickens' novel Little Dorrit, Amy Dorrit is brought up in the debtors' prison, the Marshalsea, until her family is released after inheriting a large estate.
William Dorrit, having no largesse to dispense, nevertheless manages to restore, within the walls of the Marshalsea, "the old-fashioned feudal realm that Austen's Mr Woodhouse works so hard to recoup" by accepting what he terms tributes from his petitioners that enable him "to turn his paltry dinners into displays of excess and mastery" (98).
In it Charles Dickens tells the ultimately heart-warming story of Little Dorrit herself and her stubbornly proud father holed up in the Marshalsea.
After Jennings reached the Marshalsea Prison in Southwark in May 1609 he continued to impress his captors and they continued to press the king for a pardon.
"There she is, the epitome of neatness, in the squalid atmosphere of the Marshalsea prison making order and making her father comfortable and sweeping and cleaning and tidying all the time," said Slater.
Amy risks missing the Marshalsea curfew to visit Arthur and thank him for financing Tip's release.
Amy risks missing the Marshalsea curfew to visit Arthur and thank him for financing Tip's release, and Pancks takes charge of the investigation into the Clennam family's past.