caution

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caution

(Vigilance), noun attention, attentiveness, care, carefulness, cautio, circumspection, concern, consideration, cura, diligence, exactitude, forethought, guardedness, heed, heedfulness, meticulousness, mindfulness, prudence, prudentia, regard, thoroughness, wariness, watchfulness
Associated concepts: due caution, ordinary caution

caution

(Warning), noun admonition, alarm, alert, augury, caveat, exhortation, foreboding, foretelling, monition, notice, omen, portent, precursor, presage, prognosis, prognostic
Associated concepts: cautionary instructions

caution

verb admonish, advise against, apprise, be vigilant, communicate to, counsel, dissuade, exhort, exhort to take heed, forearm, foreshow, forewarn, give advice, give fair warning, give intimation of impending evil, give notice, give warning, give warning of possible harm, inform, make aware, monere, notify of danger, persuade against, predict, prenotify, prepare for the worst, prescribe, prewarn, put on guard, remonstrate, serve notice, sound the alarm, spell danger, take precautions, urge, warn
Associated concepts: due caution, ordinary caution, unusual caution
Foreign phrases: Abundans cautela non nocet.Extreme caution does no harm.
See also: admonish, admonition, advise, alert, care, castigate, caveat, charge, counsel, deliberation, deter, deterrent, diligence, discourage, discretion, dissuade, exhort, expostulate, forewarn, heed, hesitation, indicant, inform, monition, notice, notification, notify, portend, precaution, premonition, prudence, restraint, signify, warn, warning

caution

1 a formal warning given to a person suspected or accused of an offence that his words will be taken down and may be used in evidence.
2 a warning to a person by the police, or in Scotland by the Procurator Fiscal, that while it is considered that there is enough evidence for a prosecution, no such prosecution will take place but that the matter will be kept on file.
3 a notice entered on the register of title to land that prevents a proprietor from disposing of land without a notice to the person who entered the caution.
4 see GUARANTEE.

CAUTION. A term of the Roman civil law, which is used in various senses. It signifies, sometimes, security, or security promised. Generally every writing is called cautio, a caution by which any object is provided for. Vicat, ad verb. In the common law a distinction is made between a contract and the security. The contract may be good and the security void. The contract may be divisible, and the security entire and indivisible. 2 Burr, 1082. The securities or cautions judicially required of the defendant, are, judicio sisti, to attend and appear during the pendency of the suit; de rato, to confirm the acts of his attorney or proctor; judicium solvi, to pay the sum adjudged against him. Coop. Just. 647; Hall's Admiralty Practice, 12; 2 Brown, Civ. Law, 356.

CAUTION, TURATORY, Scotch law. Juratory caution is that which a suspender swears is the best he can offer in order to obtain a suspension. Where the suspender cannot, from his low or suspected circumstances, procure unquestionable security, juratory caution is admitted. Ersk. Pr. L. Scot. 4, 3, 6.

References in periodicals archive ?
Newcastle threw caution to the wind by changing to a 3-4-3 formation.
If Iran threw caution to the wind and sought a nuclear weapon capability as quickly as possible without regard for international reaction, it might be able to produce enough highly enriched uranium for a single nuclear weapon by the end of this decade" if it overcame an array of technical difficulties, the report said.
On the other, she threw caution to the wind, fiercely inhabiting each role to the fullest--even to the point where it seemed dangerous.
Dragons' boss Denis Smith threw caution to the wind in the closing stages, sending on strikers Chris Armstrong and Hector Sam.
A TOP children's author threw caution to the wind today by suggesting that the boomerang, an iconic symbol of Australia, was, in fact, invented in Britain.
Dobie notched Albion's second in the 12th minute from a cross by James Chambers, but Villa threw caution to the wind after the break and a shot from 20 yards saw Stefan Moore reduce the arrears in the 49th minute.
LES EYRE, at odds with himself over whether to run Green Bopper, was thanking his lucky stars that he threw caution to the wind after the 25-1 shot gained a pillar-to-post victory in the valuable Edinburgh Gold Cup, writes Tom O'Ryan.
Three of the 10 entrepreneurs described here threw caution to the wind, followed their hearts, and overcame great odds to transform hobbies, lifelong interests, and other novel ideas into unique and highly profitable enterprises.
Even if oil executives threw caution to the wind and wildly stepped up exploration, that wouldn't do the trick.
On one side is a decorated Marine officer who threw caution to the wind and has, unwittingly, provided additional fodder for those who wish to quash any movement on this issue.
Fashion designers threw caution to the wind when it came to using diamond accessories with their spring 2001 looks during fashion week in New York City.
While most of us would be wrapped up warm in jumpers and scarves after feeling under the weather, RiRi threw caution to the wind and strutted her stuff in a series of revealing stage costumes.