take

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Related to took: took away

take

v. to gain or obtain possession, including the receipt of a legacy from an estate, getting title to real property, or stealing an object.

take

(Acquire), verb adopt, attach, carry, derive, excise, gain, get, impound, impress, obtain, preempt, procure, profit, reap, secure, sequester
Associated concepts: take effect, take over

take

(Deceive), verb betray, cheat, cozen, defraud, dupe, fool, gull, lead astray, mislead, victimize

take

(Seize), verb apprehend, appropriate, arrogate, capture, confiscate, embezzle, extort, grab, hijack, loot, pilfer, plunder, purloin, usurp
Associated concepts: burglary, grand larceny, grand theft, larceny, take a case from the jury, trespassing

take

(Understand), verb adopt, catch on, estimate, get the meaning of, grasp the meaning, hold as, set down as account as, take for, view as
See also: acquire, adopt, apprehend, appropriate, arrest, attach, carry, confiscate, derive, despoil, endure, excise, gain, hijack, impound, impress, inherit, loot, obtain, partake, pilfer, plunder, preempt, procure, profit, purloin, reap, receive, secure, seize, sequester, spoils, suffer, transport, trust, usurp

TAKE. This is a technical expression which signifies to be entitled to; as, a devisee will take under the will. To take also signifies to seize, as to take and carry away.

References in classic literature ?
Then I took up the pig and held him to my breast with my jacket (so he couldn't drip) till I got a good piece below the house and then dumped him into the river.
The Grand Turk took the loss greatly to heart, and with the cunning which all his race possess, he made peace with the Venetians (who were much more eager for it than he was), and the following year, seventy-four, he attacked the Goletta and the fort which Don John had left half built near Tunis.
Perhaps we'll be able to find the brooch if she'll only tell where she took it; but in any case she'll have to be severely punished, Matthew.
I fell into a high road, for so I took it to be, though it served to the inhabitants only as a foot-path through a field of barley.
I do not so much care, however, about my parents now, though I should dearly like to see them again in my own country; it is the loss of Ulysses that grieves me most; I cannot speak of him without reverence though he is here no longer, for he was very fond of me, and took such care of me that wherever he may be I shall always honour his memory.
This was the greatest and the worst prize that ever I was concerned in; for indeed, though, as I have said above, I was hardened now beyond the power of all reflection in other cases, yet it really touched me to the very soul when I looked into this treasure, to think of the poor disconsolate gentlewoman who had lost so much by the fire besides; and who would think, to be sure, that she had saved her plate and best things; how she would be surprised and afflicted when she should find that she had been deceived, and should find that the person that took her children and her goods, had not come, as was pretended, from the gentlewoman in the next street, but that the children had been put upon her without her own knowledge.
Six weeks is a long time to wait, and a still longer time for a girl to keep a secret, but Jo did both, and was just beginning to give up all hope of ever seeing her manuscript again, when a letter arrived which almost took her breath away, for on opening it, a check for a hundred dollars fell into her lap.
The child looked round the room as she took her seat.
Rostov was just mounting to go for a ride round the neighboring villages with Ilyin; he let Lavrushka have another horse and took him along with him.
Vronsky took off his soft, wide-brimmed hat and passed his handkerchief over his heated brow and hair, which had grown half over his ears, and was brushed back covering the bald patch on his head.
The three took counsel together, on hearing this, and debated what it might be best to do.
My patron lying at home longer than usual without fitting out his ship, which, as I heard, was for want of money, he used constantly, once or twice a week, sometimes oftener if the weather was fair, to take the ship's pinnace and go out into the road a- fishing; and as he always took me and young Maresco with him to row the boat, we made him very merry, and I proved very dexterous in catching fish; insomuch that sometimes he would send me with a Moor, one of his kinsmen, and the youth - the Maresco, as they called him - to catch a dish of fish for him.