Gout

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GOUT, med. jur. contracts. An inflammation of the fibrous and ligamentous parts of the joints.
     2. In cases of insurance on lives, when there is warranty of health, it seems that a man subject to the gout, is a life capable of being, insured, if he has no sickness at the time to make it an unequal contract. 2 Park, Ins. 583.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Tophaceous Gout: A Clinical and Radiographic Assessment.
Lesinurad, a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor, in combination with febuxostat in patients with tophaceous gout: Findings of a phase III clinical trial.
The case described in the present report is an unusual presentation of tophaceous gout with a single tophus in the intercondylar notch resulting in isolated extension loss.
And the results were reported as compatible with tophaceous gout.
Clinical utility of dual-energy CT for evaluation of tophaceous gout. Radiographics 2011; 31:1365-75.
It has been licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for refractory tophaceous gout. It is associated with transfusion reactions and immunogenicity.
McDermott, "Management of treatment resistant inflammation of acute on chronic tophaceous gout with anakinra," Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, vol.
Chronic tophaceous gout is caused by the formation of solid urate deposits--tophi--in the connective tissues, predominately of the fingers, toes, elbows and ears.
Biopharmaceutical company Savient Pharmaceuticals Inc (NasdaqGM :SVNT) and its wholly owned subsidiary, Savient Pharma Ireland Ltd, reported on Tuesday the receipt of the European Commission's marketing authorisation for KRYSTEXXA for the treatment of severe debilitating chronic tophaceous gout in adult patients.
It also is possible to develop what is called chronic tophaceous gout, which can cause joint damage and loss of motion.
Although rare, the presence of tophaceous gout at the site of tendon disruption, dorsum of the foot, heel, and ankle (Figure 1) has been reported.