tortuousness


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See: involution
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* the groups with the most crashes have higher tortuousness figures (see Fig.
The tortuousness of this formulation--why not "ceased to recognize her body as her own"?--shows us a Tess renouncing all male gazes, Angel's included, at the very moment his observation of "the body before him" insists on reinscribing her objectification by producing her as visible solid.
The largeness and tortuousness of the veins is used in judging dairy cattle.
Getman attributes the tortuousness of the strategic decision-making process largely to union politics, but I believe it may reflect genuine agonizing over what directions to take in a struggle of such magnitude and against such odds.
Both titles have been widely and favourably reviewed, literary editors presumably welcoming a readable form of academic criticism that rejects the jargon and tortuousness of contemporary literary theory.
An early essay (1914-15) on two poems of Friedrich Holderlin, unpublished in Benjamin's lifetime like most of the writings in this collection, employed a style that, according to the translator, is "hieratic, cryptic, and high-flown, and in places written in a German whose tortuousness defies deciphering." The translator of such a text has no choice but to replicate Benjamin's "proud refusal to produce immediate insight or aesthetic pleasure." It is hardly a criticism of Benjamin that the same might be said of virtually everything in this book: he meant it to be that way.
Yet the pursuit of nuance can lead to tortuousness: 'The dangers (as well as the pleasures) of not being gainsaid attract Romantic poets to the community of perception which allusions can imply when they appear as echoes' (pp.