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trade

1) n. a business or occupation for profit, particularly in retail or wholesale sales or requiring special mechanical skill. 2) v. to exchange one thing for another, which includes money for goods, goods for goods, and favors for goods or money. (See: trade fixture, trade secret, trademark)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

trade

operations of a commercial character involving the provision to customers of goods or services for reward; an adventure in the nature of a trade connotes a single such operation.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

TRADE. In its most extensive signification this word includes all sorts of dealings by way of Bale or exchange. In a more limited sense it signifies the dealings in a particular business, as the India trade; by trade is also understood the business of a particular mechanic, hence boys are said to be put apprentices to learn a trade, as the trade of a carpenter, shoemaker, and the like. Bac. Ab. Master and Servant, D 1. Trade differs from art. (q.v.)
     2. It is the policy of the law to encourage trade, and therefore all contracts which restrain the exercise of a man's talents in trade are detrimental to the commonwealth, and therefore void; though he may bind himself not to exercise a trade in a particular place, for, in this last case, as he may pursue it in another place, the commonwealth has the benefit of it. 8 Mass. 223; 9 Mass. 522. Vide Ware R. 257, 260 Com. Dig. h.t.; Vin. Ab. h.t.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nexa Technologies' Tick Data division, provider of valueadded historical intraday financial data, and Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX) have unveiled ready-to-use trade and quote data for equities traded on TSX.
Accordingly, in Amity, the taxpayer was required to separately pool goods manufactured in its own facilities from related goods acquired from its wholly owned subsidiaries, notwithstanding the fact that the goods at issue were identical, produced by an affiliate and sold as part of a single trade or business, and the taxpayer exercised significant control over the production of the purchased goods.
Says Hendrik Bessembinder, "But to those who are unhappy with a specialist's ability to make money, I would pose a question: 'What alternative method do you suggest for compensating a specialist?'" Indeed, recent research suggests human intervention is important, even indispensable to some stock trades--and not just trades in small stocks, either.
The Canary case complaint also alleged that a little-known uninsured national banking association called Security Trust Co., an intermediary commonly used by third-party administrators of employee benefit plans to consolidate participant's mutual fund trades, also permitted Canary to late-trade through its accounts with mutual funds--as late as 9 p.m.
The SEC ignored the fact that all trades on impersonal stock exchanges involve the potential for asymmetric information; one party frequently will know something the other does not.
The best-known example is the Acid Rain Program established under the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990, which allows electric utilities to trade allowance credits in sulfur dioxide (S[O.sub.2]).
Day traders generally trade on points (equivalent to $1).
The SEC's request for comment on market fragmentation seeks suggestions to improve disclosures both by market centers and by brokers about the handling of orders and the execution of trades. Transparency is a fundamental organizing principle of markets.
Since there are no free lunches, the manager must "pay up" for trades to compensate for the research he receives from the soft dollar broker.
Yet few discussed the trade school training available to the 50 percent of Americans who will never go to college at all.
These restrictions imply that inside trades are rarely motivated by specific inside information that would violate insider-trading laws.
Another alternative: Permit firm personnel to trade clients' securities only when they're held indirectly through a mutual fund (the fund and manager should not be firm clients) or in a discretionary investment account, where someone unconnected to the firm (that is, free from access to its nonpublic information) independently decides what securities to buy or sell.