treasure

(redirected from treasurable)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
See: cash, conserve, depository, foster, fund, garner, hoard, keep, money, possession, possessions, preserve, property, protect, regard, shelter, store, substance

treasure

in Scotland, treasure found hidden in the ground belongs to the Crown and not to the finder nor the owner of the land. See TREASURE TROVE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dato' Seri Abdullah Bin Haji Ahmad Badawi, the fifth prime minister stated that the most treasurable assets of a nation are the people.
If the written contributions of no fewer than seventeen curators, critics, artists, and historians offer a predictably mixed bag, the catalogue's most treasurable section consists of a 360-page cornucopia of photographs documenting the original exhibition from the initial installation stages to its opening.
Nightfall (Tourneur, 1957) is another admirable film, not lawless, but treasurable. And again Goodis has no problem excelling the film.
The Met's Anna Netrebko may be diva of the day, and certainly had her treasurable moments in the role; but I've no hesitation at all in awarding the Bolena crown to Washington's royal Radvanovsky.
Whether in the form of treasurable content such as BMW Films or Macy's 'Yes Virginia', ad agencies are actively creat- ing products that people love.And, as the saying goes, that's when you never have to say you're sorry.
This message contained the treasurable apercu that Animal Farm's pigs "are far more intelligent than the other animals, and therefore the best qualified to run the farm." Nor were New York publishers, even genuinely freedom-loving ones, much more sagacious: Dial Press insisted "it was impossible to sell animal stories in the U.S.A." Eventually, Secker & Warburg took the manuscript, and made a fortune from it, acquiring the rights to 1984 as well.
Some of the anecdotes, old and new, are treasurable and will no doubt be repeated in many sermons but also in historical lectures and books.
Another from 1987 is an equally treasurable recital by the great Welsh soprano Margaret Price accompanied by Geoffrey Parsons.
"I wanted to give our audience and myself something longer lasting, treasurable and totally unique," says Tracey.
But what this recording really special was that the sound quality and the performances were both treasurable.
Indeed not--it remains treasurable. Yet the issue here is not merely social, but spiritual--the poem offers an analysis of the soul's attitude toward God as well as toward people.