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treatment

in environmental law relating to waste, the physical, thermal, chemical or biological processes, including sorting, that change the characteristics of waste in order to reduce its volume, reduce its hazardous nature, facilitate its handling, or enhance its recoverability.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Like all Health Extension products--including the original Crunchy Heart Shaped Treat, with chicken and brown rice--the buffalo treats contain no wheat, corn, soy, GMO ingredients or artificial preservatives.
Don't stuff your dog's Christmas stocking with bone treats. Giving these to your pooches can cost them their lives.
Since pet treats comprise a significant portion of the overall pet product market, stocking a variety of treat items in the pet aisle would be a wise step for retailers hungry for a piece of the profits.
Thus, it appears that, even though the regulations treat the distributed interest as having been acquired on the date the qualified trust acquired such interest, there will be no retroactive application that could either cause or undo an ownership shift or change on those prior testing dates.
Most specialty drugs treat chronic or complex illnesses that affect less than 3% of the general population, but they come with a significant price tag--these patients account for 25% to 30% of a company's overall medical costs.
Previously, the company offered the LT Internal Plasma Treater to treat the interior of rotomolded parts to permit good foam adhesion.
During 2004-2005, contact with Salmonella-contaminated pet treats of beef and seafood origin resulted in nine culture-confirmed human Salmonella Thompson infections in western Canada and the state of Washington.
The Golden Rule of working with customers, though, is that everyone should be treated in the way THEY would like to be treated.
"Most prison systems are purposely not testing for hep C," charges civil rights lawyer Michelle Burrows, who led the Oregon lawsuit, "so they can say 'we don't know who's got it,' and don't have to treat it."
TEI believes it would be more appropriate to treat amounts allocated to restrictive covenants in connection with the sale of shares of a corporation (or an interest in a partnership) carrying on a business as additional proceeds on the shares (or partnership interest) rather than deeming such amounts to be on income account from a separate source.
In addition, the company is now engaged in a human clinical trial in Germany evaluating the use of its TRCs to treat limb ischemia in diabetic patients through the regeneration of vascular tissue in extremities.