Tree

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TREE. A woody plant, which in respect of thickness and height grows greater than any other plant.
     2. Trees are part of the real estate while growing, and before they are severed from the freehold; but as soon as they are cut down, they are personal property.
     3. Some trees are timber trees, while others do not bear that denomination. Vide Timber, and 2 Bl. Com. 281.
     4. Trees belong to the owner of the land where they grow, but if the roots go out of one man's land into that of another, or the branches spread over the adjoining estates, such roots or branches may be cut off by the owner of the land into which they thus grow. Rolle's R. 394; 3 Bulst. 198; Vin. Ab. Trees, E; and tit. Nuisance, W 2, pl. 3; 8 Com. Dig. 983; 2 Com. Dig. 274; 10 Vin. Ab. 142; 20 Viii. Ab. 415; 22 Vin. Ab. 583; 1 Supp. to Ves. jr. 138; 2 Supp. to Ves. jr. 162, 448; 6 Ves. 109.
     5. When the roots grow into the adjoining land, the owner of such land may lawfully claim a right to hold the tree in common with the owner of the land where it was planted; but if the branches only overshadow the adjoining land, and the root does not enter it, the tree wholly belongs owner of the estate where the roots grow. 1 Swift's Dig. 104; 1 Hill. Ab. 6; 1 Ld. Raym. 737. Vide 13 Pick. R. 44; 1 Pick., R. 224; 4 Mass. R. 266; 6 N. H. Rep. 430; 3 Day, 476; 11 Co. 50; Rob. 316; 2 Rolle, It. 141 Moo. & Mal. 112; 11 Conn. R. 177; 7 Conn. 125; 8 East, R. 394; 5 B. & Ald. 600; 1 Chit. Gen. Pr. 625; 2 Phil. Ev. 138; Gale & Wheat. on Easem. 210; Code Civ. art. 671; Pardes. Tr. des Servitudes, 297; Bro. Ab. Demand, 20; Dall. Dict. mot Servitudes, art. 3 Sec. 8; 2 P. Wms. 606; Moor, 812; Hob. 219; Plowd. 470; 5 B. & C. 897; S. C. 8 D. & R. 651. When the tree grows directly on the boundary line, so that the line passes through it, it is the property of both owners, whether it be marked as a boundary or not. 12 N. H. Rep. 454.

References in periodicals archive ?
Casagrande, 'Myopia in the lid-sutured tree shrew (Tupaia glis)', Brain Research, vol.
McBrien, 'Expression of muscarinic receptors in tree shrew ocular tissues', Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, vol.
Instead, the pitcher uses tasty nectar to attract tree shrews, then ensures its pitcher is big enough to collect the feeding mammal's droppings.
To find out, Dr Clarke and colleagues Lijin Chin of Monash University and Dr Jonathan Moran of Royal Roads University in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada turned their attention to tree shrews, which inhabit the same forest as N.
In the mid-1970s, researchers studying emmetropization found that when they sewed shut the eyelids of young chicks, tree shrews (mammals closely related to primates), and monkeys, the animals developed severe myopia.
For experiment 1, we asked whether tree shrews and rats would abstract transitive relation in the training task.
The team used MRI scanners to analyse the arrangement of canals and eye muscles in 51 species of mammal including giraffes, camels and zebra, tree shrews, bats and sloths.
Moreover, HHV-1 can naturally pass to primitive primates such as tree shrews (9).
The researchers found, for example, that the fraction of the brain occupied by the telencephalon--which includes the cortex--reaches 28 percent in insectivores, 55 percent in tree shrews, 81 percent in primates, and 95 percent in people.
In this new approach to molecular phylogenetics, vicariance, and plate tectonics, Heads shows that the distribution ranges of primates and their nearest relatives, the tree shrews and the flying lemurs, conforms to a pattern that would be expected from their having evolved from a widespread ancestor.
The order includes plants that command the pollination services of birds, bats, tree shrews, and even lemurs.
documented neural generation throughout adulthood in the hippocampus and adjacent regions of the inner brain of rats and tree shrews.