References in classic literature ?
Your father and I had a trouble once, and I thought I could never forgive him; so I kept away for years.
For without that, there useth to be more trepidation in court upon the first breaking out of troubles, than were fit.
It was hard work for him to leave her--hard to think that he should not know for days how she was bearing her trouble.
She told me I might write her word after a while, how we went on, and how mother bore up under her trouble.
But I never said nothing, never let on; kept it to myself; it's the best way; then you don't have no quarrels, and don't get into no trouble.
In many cases it is inevitable that the shame is felt to be the worst part of crime; and it would have required a great deal of disentangling reflection, such as had never entered into Rosamond's life, for her in these moments to feel that her trouble was less than if her husband had been certainly known to have done something criminal.
If he could bring her to feel with some solemnity that here was a slander which must be met and not run away from, and that the whole trouble had come out of his desperate want of money, it would be a moment for urging powerfully on her that they should be one in the resolve to do with as little money as possible, so that they might weather the bad time and keep themselves independent.
Thus urged, he would frequently give himself the trouble of watching them from the windows during their play; at times, he would follow them through the grounds, and too often came suddenly upon them while they were dabbling in the forbidden well, talking to the coachman in the stables, or revelling in the filth of the farm-yard--and I, meanwhile, wearily standing, by, having previously exhausted my energy in vain attempts to get them away.
I remember one afternoon in spring, when, owing to the rain, they could not go out; but, by some amazing good fortune, they had all finished their lessons, and yet abstained from running down to tease their parents--a trick that annoyed me greatly, but which, on rainy days, I seldom could prevent their doing; because, below, they found novelty and amusement--especially when visitors were in the house; and their mother, though she bid me keep them in the schoolroom, would never chide them for leaving it, or trouble herself to send them back.
He sat up, just out of range of one restless, beating arm, yearned to come closer and lick again the face of the god who knew him not, and who, he knew, loved him well, and palpitatingly shared and suffered all Skipper's trouble.
I intend to give you some trouble yet,' said I; 'and perhaps, sir, you will find yourself checkmated before you are aware.
5) over-solicitude for his men, which exposes him to worry and trouble.