ultrahazardous activity


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ultrahazardous activity

n. an action or process which is so inherently dangerous that the person or entity conducting the activity is "strictly liable" for any injury caused by the activity. Examples: working with high explosives or conducting a professional auto race on public streets.

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Stafford's lawsuit alleges negligence, willful and wanton conduct and ultrahazardous activity, saying the defendants "had the ability to regulate the emissions of ethylene oxide" but instead failed to warn the public of the health risk, according to NBC 5's website, which first broke the story.
The supervisors on the scene should have known that created a risk to an already ultrahazardous activity, the document stated.
(38) Thus, the lawyer could assert the operation of an autonomous vehicle is an ultrahazardous activity. (39) The lawyer most certainly move beyond this almost archaic legal theory, and assert liability on the basis of product liability law.
an ultrahazardous activity is liable to another whose person, land or
It seeks 16 million dollars in damages for the rappers "gross negligence," "ultrahazardous activity" and "intentional illegal acts."( ANI )
That exclusion can apply, for example, to someone who dies during an ultrahazardous activity, he said.
(9) Other courts have imposed strict liability on rail carriers for accidents, openly acknowledging the carriers were not negligent, but holding nonetheless that the rail transportation of hazardous materials was precisely the type of ultrahazardous activity strict liability theories were developed to address.
(104) Such activities include those involving a high probability of causing significant transboundary harm or a low probability of causing disastrous transboundary harm ('ultrahazardous activity').
1997) ("Plaintiff has cited no cases imposing strict tort liability for ultrahazardous activity on a party who is not even alleged to have been connected with the ...
In January 1995, relatives of people killed or hurt by handguns sued 49 firearms manufacturers in federal court, alleging negligent marketing, design defect, ultrahazardous activity, and fraud.
Strict liability was initially reserved for situations deemed to be inherently dangerous or deemed to be an ultrahazardous activity. Examples were demolition by blasting, keeping wild animals, or putting on fireworks displays.
Similar accountability may exist under the common law theories of ultrahazardous activity, trespass, or nuisance.

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