uncourtly


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21) In measured tones he lectures Arthur to avoid the kind of uncourtly, compensatory bluster the King rather nervously directs at him, since such spurious shows of bravery in fact suggest insecurity and lack of bravery (ll.
Parts of co-editor David Bevington's introduction and his bold chapter on The Tempest as a commercial, public, and uncourtly treatment of the Elizabeth-Frederick of the Palatinate marriage do seem curiously at odds with the direction of the majority of contributors, relying upon precisely the sort of "decayed aristocracy" (with a bow towards Lawrence Stone) and "capitalism vs.
All you saw of it was an ingrained courtesy, an uncourtly courtesy that emanated from him towards everyone.
The furious female, as if considering his uncourtly act as a rape, runs after him, knocks him down, turns him on his back, rips his belly open, and devours its contents with gusto.
It is refreshing now to have the songs side by side with the motets, and to have the picture of uniformity exploded not only by this juxtaposition but also by the inclusion of such motets as 'Ut heremita solus', 'Gaude Maria' and 'Caeleste beneficium', as well as several uncourtly songs whose sexual and social innuendoes are scarcely concealed ('Baisies moy', 'Fors seulement contre', 'Prenez sur moy', 'S'elle m'amera').
What was new about Galileo's translation of scientific marvels into the discourse of the court (or of a specific dynasty, as in the case of the satellites of Jupiter)," writes Biagioli, "was that he did so both to show that natural philosophy was not necessarily an uncourtly activity, and to legitimize scientific discoveries and theories by linking them to the power image of the prince.
Decidedly uncourtly, however, is the overt linking of language and sexuality in the (initially shocking) reference to vaginal speech when the second maiden gives her gift.
2) In Beroul, Marc is too courtly to kill Tristran when he has him at his mercy; in the Prose the positions are reversed, and it is a sign of courtliness in Tristran that he refuses to take advantage of the uncourtly Marc when he stands over the King, sword raised ready to strike.
Fletcher's own patronage ties were to the fifth earl and countess of Huntingdon, and thus to "the country-based, feminocentric, uncourtly environment cultivated by the Huntingdons at Ashby" (35).
Although she vilifies her spouse, she so prizes a refinement of manners that even in the anguish of being forced apart from her lover, she refuses to part "ignobly" ("malamen"), implying that to banish one's love before the moment of utmost necessity would be uncourtly.