undemonstrable


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As Nietzsche writes: "[t]he [true] world, unattainable, undemonstrable, cannot be promised, but even when merely thought of a consolation, a duty, an imperative.
Aristotle likens it to "perception" and "judgment," and it is clear that phronesis includes nous ("intuition," "understanding," sometimes simply "sense"), the virtue--which is also a part of sophia or wisdom--by which the intellect is able to grasp undemonstrable truths.
In each of the six cases examined, amateur (and even vaguely professional) investigators root about in the back woods for some mythical monster; each makes a vague and undemonstrable discovery.
And a recent survey article on naturalism in philosophy of science describes Nagel's presidential address, cited above, as arguing against the objection that, "in committing itself to the logic of scientific proof without further foundations, naturalism is quite analogous to religious belief in resting on unsupported and undemonstrable faith" (Rosenberg, 1996, p.
I would argue rather that these `contemporary theorists' (3) cannot logically make such a distinction, because to do so would be to claim an undemonstrable authority and privileged knowledge.
Practical reason (phronesis) is about what is open to deliberation (NE 1141b9-13), which is about neither what is known nor belief (NE 1142a32-b16, 1143a1-7), and requires the development of nous (NE 1141a2-8), the faculty of rational intuition about undemonstrable first principles, which for Aristotle connotes being sensible or having common sense (NE 1110a8-11, 1112a19-21, 1115b7-11).
Of the "failure" of this or that "socialist program" (often juxtaposed to the implied -- generally undemonstrable -- path to success had the counterfactual "correct path" been followed)?
So the typographical distinction in the Norton Hamlet is not between Quarto-only and Folio passages, but between the Oxford Edition and the Quarto-only lines discarded by the Oxford editors in their undemonstrable belief that Shakespeare cut them during revision.
The definition of immediates is an undemonstrable positing of what they are.
As Powers notes, explaining photographer August Sander's failed attempt to record "his human encyclopedia," Man of the Twentieth Century: "The shattered, overambitious, unfinished work seems the best possible vehicle for its undemonstrable subject.
She turned her most lethal guns against the French deconstructionists Derrida and Foucault whom she decried as "fantastic, Oriental and Hebraic" in the sense of indeterminate, irrational, and undemonstrable.
One paradoxical consequence of this weakened sense of certitude was that late Pater was more willing to concede the function of arbiter to custom when the arguments on both sides of a question were equally persuasive or equally unpersuasive--when, for example, atheism proves as undemonstrable as theism.