Understanding

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Understanding

A general term referring to an agreement, either express or implied, written or oral.

The term understanding is an ambiguous one; in order to determine whether a particular understanding would constitute a contract that is legally binding on the parties involved, the circumstances must be examined to discover whether a meeting of the minds and an intent to be bound occurred.

Cross-references

Meeting of Minds.

References in classic literature ?
131): "We learn to understand a concept as we learn to walk, dance, fence or play a musical instrument: it is a habit, i.e.
When we understand a word, there is a reciprocal association between it and the images of what it "means." Images may cause us to use words which mean them, and these words, heard or read, may in turn cause the appropriate images.
If a word has the right associations with other objects, we shall be able to use it correctly, and understand its use by others, even if it evokes no image.
I understand, he said, that you are speaking of the province of geometry and the sister arts.
And when I speak of the other division of the intelligible, you will understand me to speak of that other sort of knowledge which reason herself attains by the power of dialectic, using the hypotheses not as first principles, but only as hypotheses-- that is to say, as steps and points of departure into a world which is above hypotheses, in order that she may soar beyond them to the first principle of the whole; and clinging to this and then to that which depends on this, by successive steps she descends again without the aid of any sensible object, from ideas, through ideas, and in ideas she ends.
"Did you understand that sign?" asked His Majesty, politely.
"Do you understand the language of the Gillikins, my dear?"
Don't you understand that if you stay here they will treat you--"
I want you clearly to understand how I am placed, supposing a distinguished member of my household--supposing even you, Prince Maiyo--were to come within the arm of the law.
So, when I said you had less understanding than we, I did not mean that you had less understanding, you understand, but that you had less standundering, so to speak.
So the only way to avoid a terrible battle was to explain the joke so they could understand it.
"I quite understand," answered Princess Mary, with a sad smile.