understandings


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On the understanding of words, a very admirable little book is Ribot's "Evolution of General Ideas," Open Court Co.
Thus understanding in this sense may be reduced to mere physiological causal laws.
And certain it is, that the light that a man receiveth by counsel from another, is drier and purer, than that which cometh from his own understanding and judgment; which is ever infused, and drenched, in his affections and customs.
You have quite conceived my meaning, I said; and now, corresponding to these four divisions, let there be four faculties in the soul-reason answering to the highest, understanding to the second, faith (or conviction) to the third, and perception of shadows to the last-and let there be a scale of them, and let us suppose that the several faculties have clearness in the same degree that their objects have truth.
There is no understanding the white man," Ebbits went on doggedly.
But the white man of one day is not the white man of next day, and there is no understanding him.
SOCRATES: And if he disobeys and disregards the opinion and approval of the one, and regards the opinion of the many who have no understanding, will he not suffer evil?
SOCRATES: Take a parallel instance:--if, acting under the advice of those who have no understanding, we destroy that which is improved by health and is deteriorated by disease, would life be worth having?
Only in discerning between the Father and the Mother would the Circular infant find problems for the exercise of its understanding -- problems too often likely to be corrupted by maternal impostures with the result of shaking the child's faith in all logical conclusions.
Anne knew that Lady Russell must be suffering some pain in understanding and relinquishing Mr Elliot, and be making some struggles to become truly acquainted with, and do justice to Captain Wentworth.
There is a quickness of perception in some, a nicety in the discernment of character, a natural penetration, in short, which no experience in others can equal, and Lady Russell had been less gifted in this part of understanding than her young friend.
Each legend, each superstition which we receive, will help in the understanding and possible elucidation of the others.