unfairness


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References in classic literature ?
Jerry did not quite understand, but he sensed the difference and resented, without expressing in action, the wrongness and unfairness of it.
He knew not why, had no evidence why, but he felt cruelty and power and unfairness.
It was the unfairness of the thing which hurt Maud.
In this study we have examined how consumers perceive price unfairness when they learn they have missed a promotion after purchasing.
Critic Ceridwen Lloyd Morgan said Claudia's work took us behind the obvious unfairness of a local struggle against English political power into the intimacy of the private lives of those who had to give up their homes and their community.
Until now, it was thought that only humans and some primates such as chimpanzees are sensitive to unfairness.
4 : to say or think bad things about (someone or something) <He cursed the unfairness of the world.
The Government has no solution to the unfairness of council tax, apart from asking pensioners to claim discredited means-tested benefits.
I WOULD like to draw the attention of the authorities in the Midlands, where the water rates system is the same as in Birmingham, to the diabolical unfairness of the system.
When people think of revolutions, they usually envision a group, a faction, or a nation rising up against some kind of perceived injustice or unfairness.
Despite the loss of a redistricting-reform measure in the 2005 California special election, even lawmakers have since come to recognize the unfairness of the system they control to draw legislative and congressional district lines.
If that doesn't convince you, perhaps the unfairness of our property tax-based system should.