unhealable


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As well as reconfiguring the identities of those arrivals in London, Murray also shows how his chosen authors disclose a sense of obligation towards the Ireland left behind and what Edward Said refers to as the 'unhealable rift' of exile.
Therefore, Darwish employs beauty in a therapeutic way by assigning it the task to heal the unhealable wounds from within.
The plight of outcast members and exiles, as Said (1991) hauntingly reminds us, "is the unhealable rift forced between a human being and a native place, between the self and its true home: its essential sadness can never be surmounted" (357).
But it is probably the account that Julia gives of her father that constitutes the most dramatic example of linguistic and territorial dislocation, of what Edward Said has called "the unhealable rift forced between a human being and a native place, between the self and its true home" (200K 173).
(4.) Exile is 'the unhealable rift forced between a human being and a native place, between the self and its true home: its essential sadness can never be surmounted (Said, cited in Ibrahim 1996, p.
In his essay "Reflections on Exile," Edward Said describes exile as the "unhealable rift forced between a human being and a native place, between the self and its true home." Insisting that the "essential sadness can never be surmounted," Said, after the fashion of Shakespeare's Romeo, identifies exile as "like death, but without death's ultimate mercy." (30) Moses Finley agrees: banishment, especially in the ancient world, was deemed "the bitterest of fates.
Edward Said describes exile as "the unhealable rift forced between a human and a native place, between the self and its true home," and he concludes that "its essential sadness can never be surmounted" (173).
Was she both a willing expatriate and an exile, who suffered what Edward Said has described as 'the unhealable rift', the 'essential sadness' caused by the loss of 'something left behind forever'?
As the war veteran Ben Viljoen observed, "There is scarcely an Afrikander family without an unhealable wound.
His blame inflicted an unhealable wound, which caused her to "sometimes ...
He shows how to assess and treat using eco-ethological existential analytic methods within that cultural competence, which he asserts is the only way to achieve any degree of true healing in what is, in reality, an unhealable culture.
Praised or damned, Auden is denied greatness, a status often believed impossible and, interestingly enough, always based on some Romantic idea of greatness: visionary greatness to somehow heal the (unhealable) internal injury of being human.