unimpeached


Also found in: Dictionary.
See: inculpable
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a verdict should not be directed." (44) The Court also held that a judge must draw all reasonable inferences in favor of the nonmoving party and consider "evidence supporting the moving party that is uncontradicted and unimpeached, at least to the extent that that evidence comes from disinterested witnesses." (45) While Scott did not explicitly replace this standard, some have argued that its attitude broadened the scope of summary judgment motions.
J's veracity was unimpeached. So {he} presume {d} {Pond} wrote another Letter {sic} in order to obtain a decided opposition in the two declarations." (13) Judson was justified in denying that he received a reprimand, according to Nott, because what he actually received was an admonition.
1994) (finding that prosecutor allowed key government witness to give unimpeached testimony that was either patently false or seriously misleading and which severely undercut the defense); United States v.
Here the specter of anti-aristocratic revolution rises in an altered form: we see the Countess' status subjected to a contest of skill, albeit one limited to gentlemen of "unimpeached birth" (378).
the habeas corpus act, the methods of obtaining this writ are so plainly pointed out and enforced, that, so long as this statute remains unimpeached, no subject of England can long be detained in prison, except in those cases in which the law requires and justifies such detainer....
Najib could be disgraced, cleared with his honor unimpeached or, perhaps worst, left with a cloud hanging over him, the allegations neither repudiated nor confirmed.
Amid the storm of doubly distilled venom with which they have assailed Gesner, his character and reputation stand unimpeached, and the only effect of their malignity has been to raise him, if possible, yet higher in the estimation of the people of New Brunswick."
If we let Bush get away unimpeached for all the offenses he has committed, then we send the signal that what he has done is OK.
miraculously remained both unprosecuted and unimpeached.
Court] stands unimpeached and unimpeachable." South Carolina's
(140.) Mark Tushnet correctly notes that "[t]here's nothing in the Constitution that precludes the (effective) removal of an unimpeached President who has become ineffective at governing and who has lost almost all support within his party.
When, for example, we encounter the assertion that "[i]t would not be consistent with equity and good conscience to permit the bargain to remain unimpeached," (218) we have the impression that conscience is "out there"--removed from what any one person thinks is right.