unmoral


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Gordon's sonnet makes it clear that the femme fatale no longer has anything to do with modernism, and does so by describing the figure in terms evocative of kitsch: Whistler and Wilde said Beauty was unmoral And bards with dandruff wrote erotic stanzas Of dames with eyes of jade and lips of coral, Thrilling the Philistines in Leeds and Kansas.
The early law asked simply, "Did the defendant do the physical act which damaged the plaintiff?" The law of today, except in certain cases based upon public policy, asks the further question, "Was the act blameworthy?" The ethical standard of reasonable conduct has replaced the unmoral standard of acting at one's peril.
Another's sexual history is quite telling: "history of unmoral conduct since early life, sex interest quite pronounced.
Personnel studies compiled by Army War College officials in the 1920s and 1930s concluded that black soldiers were "child-like," "shiftless," "irresponsible," "superstitious," "unmoral and untruthful," and "emotionally unstable," although "if fed, loyal and compliant." They determined that black officers were "lacking in physical courage and psychological characteristics," making them "inherently inferior" to their white counterparts.
his miscellany Something New, Griffith reflects on the "Unmoral
Administrators at a number of big city universities, and of every campus in the University of California system where I(unmoral work, have begun to worry more and more about how a great many people who work at the university-particularly clerical-technical staff and often junior faculty-can no longer afford to live where they work.
Burkitt, a former professor of divinity at Cambridge, puts it: "I cannot but suppose that the story in Mark, so odd, so unmoral, so unlike conventional ideas of what Jesus ought to have done and said, does really rest upon reminiscence, however inaccurate, of an actual occurrence." In other words, if the story weren't true, why on earth would it have been included in the Gospel?
Rose had the simple, promiscuous unmorality of the black people." Melanctha, on the other hand, is "graceful, pale yellow, intelligent, attractive": She "had not been raised by white folks but then she had been half made with real white blood." Contrasting their different ancestries, the narrator wonders "why was this unmoral, promiscuous, shiftless Rose married, and that's not so common either, to a good man of the negroes, while Melanctha with her white blood and attraction and her desire for a right position had not yet been really married" (86).
Why did the subtle, intelligent, attractive, half white girl Melanctha Herbert love and do for and demean herself in service to this coarse, decent, sullen, ordinary, black childish Rose, and why was this unmoral, promiscuous, shiftless Rose married, and that's not so common either, to a good man of the negroes, while Melanctha with her white blood and attraction and her desire for a right position had not yet been really married.
But he also regards Shelley's elevated rhetoric, supplicatory attitude, and non-Christian object of praise as irreverent and wholly inappropriate for a literary hymn: "If Shelley's unmoral attitude of artistic elevation had been the standpoint of the new [Romantic] movement, it might doubtless have come and gone with no perceptible influence on Hymnody" (435-36).
The American Psychological Association recently voted by a huge majority that to hold out such a goal for therapy would be unethical and unmoral because there is no scientific evidence that such a change is possible," he said.