unpoetic


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See: prosaic
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21) As Victor Grassmann (1966, 88-9) notes, the diction here combines high poetic expressions with unpoetic vocabulary, incorporating language from the street and the barnyard.
Perhaps it is because these recovered works tend toward the editorial, interesting as often as not for how un-Whitmanian, even unpoetic, they can be.
The agent of the poetically burning petals is an unpoetic "cigarette-butt.
He states that, in an unpoetic way, a full text of Hamlet can be written in the most reduced manner using devices of SMS for a faster reading.
He further adds, "you think I am a brute, of course, and horribly unpoetic.
For instance, Julie describes Bai Juyi as a great conversationalist, a good host, a pleasure to visit, and a comparable drinking companion in "A Great Poet"; she reuses the Chinese form of poetry on objects (yong wu shi) to humanize what is nonhuman, and to poetize what is seemingly unpoetic in "Stove" and "Chair"; she re-contextualizes Chinese dramatic figures, natural scenes, and ethical dilemmas in "Reply to the Tune 'On the Water Clock at Night' by Wen Tingyun," "Reply to 'Autumn Songs of the Hall of Abiding Faith' by Wang Changling," and "Reply to the Tune 'Audience at Golden Gate' by Wei Zhuang.
Meanwhile, Francalou's daughter Lucille has fallen for the works of Damis, but mistakes Damis's friend, the dashing and unpoetic Dorante, for Damis.
She counters the charges of modernist critics that The Earthly Paradise is escapist, noting that Morris's choice of carefully framed and ornamented older stories constituted a sophisticated response to Victorian debates about the use of earlier literary materials, and that the poem's blend of classical and medieval sentiment was designed to provide a new form of modern epic for an unpoetic age.
As long as this land, my country is unpoetic in its doings it'll be poetic to disagree.
Or to stay closer to the music, Ashbery's combination of rhetorical but unpoetic, multisyllabic words, such as "emblematic," "encapsulizes," and "Stellification," with proselike, monosyllabic expressions, such as "Then one day," "But why not?
Traduite de l'anglois (1742), a poem of modest quality on the distinctly unpoetic subject of English foreign policy.