unwonted


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Related to unwonted: appeasingly, peremptorily, mincingly, chidden
References in classic literature ?
Welland imparted, blanched and demolished by the unwonted obligation of having at last to fix her eyes on the unpleasant and the discreditable.
Considering that the price of dogs had been boomed skyward by the unwonted demand, it was not an unfair sum for so fine an animal.
He was growing stout and soft, and there was unwonted flabbiness in his muscles.
MILLWARD,' I exclaimed, in a tone of wrathful menace that made the reverend gentleman look round - aghast - astounded at such unwonted insolence, and stare me in the face, with a look that plainly said, 'What, this to me
As I was saying," he went on, as though nothing unwonted had happened, "the shark was not in the reckoning.
The flutter of her manner, in the unwonted noise of the streets; the spare shawl, carried unfolded on her arm; the heavy umbrella, and little basket; the loose long-fingered gloves, to which her hands were unused; all bespoke an old woman from the country, in her plain holiday clothes, come into Coketown on an expedition of rare occurrence.
But his exertions on this particular day had been of an unwonted sort, and he had performed great physical feats which left him less jaded than his tranquil stroll through the Louvre.
It seemed he would fly to pieces, so terrible was the control he was exerting, holding together by an unwonted indecision the counter-forces that struggled within him for mastery.
There was the widow before him, bouncing bodily here and there, with unwonted vigour; and Mr.
A quick conception of all that this accusation meant for her nerved her with unwonted courage to deny it.
It showed Pearl in an unwonted aspect Heretofore, the mother, while loving her child with the intensity of a sole affection, had schooled herself to hope for little other return than the waywardness of an April breeze, which spends its time in airy sport, and has its gusts of inexplicable passion, and is petulant in its best of moods, and chills oftener than caresses you, when you take it to your bosom; in requital of which misdemeanours it will sometimes, of its own vague purpose, kiss your cheek with a kind of doubtful tenderness, and play gently with your hair, and then be gone about its other idle business, leaving a dreamy pleasure at your heart.
From the streets beyond the high wall and the strong gate, there came the usual night hum of the city, with now and then an indescribable ring in it, weird and unearthly, as if some unwonted sounds of a terrible nature were going up to Heaven.