utter

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Utter

To publish or offer; to send into circulation.

The term utter is frequently used in reference to Commercial Paper. To utter and publish an instrument is to declare, either directly or indirectly through words or action, that it is good. It constitutes a crime, for example, to utter a forged check.

utter

v. 1) to issue a forged document. 2) to speak. (See: forgery)

utter

verb air, announce, articulate, assert, aver, breathe, broach, circulate, come out with, communicate, declaim, declare, deliver, dicere, disclose, emit, enunciate, express, give expression to, give forth, impart, issue, make known, mouth, proclaim, propound, publicize, publish, recite, reveal, sound, speak, spread, state, talk, tell, vent, voice
See also: absolute, arrant, avow, comment, communicate, complete, confess, converse, declare, definite, disclose, disseminate, enunciate, express, flagrant, gross, mention, observe, outright, phrase, proclaim, profess, pronounce, publish, pure, recite, relate, remark, reveal, speak, stark, tell, thorough, total, unconditional, unequivocal, unlimited, unmitigated, unqualified

TO UTTER, crim. law. To offer, to publish.
     2. To utter and publish a counterfeit note is to assert and declare, directly or indirectly, by words or actions, that the note offered is good. It is not necessary that it should be passed in order to complete the offence of uttering. 2. Binn. R. 338, 9. It seems that reading out a document, although the party refuses to show it, is a sufficient uttering. Jebb's Ir. Cr. Cas. 282. Vide East, P. C. 179; Leach, 251; 2 Stark. Ev. 378 1 Moody, C. C. 166; 2 East, P. C. 974 Russ. & Ry. 113; 1 Phil. Ev. Index, h.t.; Roscoe's Cr. Ev. 301. The merely showing a false instrument with intent to gain a credit when there was no intention or attempt made to pass it, it seems would not amount to an uttering. Russ. & Ry. 200. Vide Ringing the charge.

References in periodicals archive ?
They are located in a particular socio-historical context, and have as protagonist an utterer that produces the text according to his or her interlocutor, in a dialogical relationship that always seeks a responsive position.
(177) Put another way, "[A]n utterance or a text is a 'speech act' undertaken to communicate the intention of an utterer or author.
(10) Not only are natural languages replete with ambiguities, but the meaning of sentences employing even unambiguous language will be opaque in the absence of reference to the utterer's intent.
Grice, Utterer's Meaning, Sentence-Meaning, and Word-Meaning, 4 FOUND.
The words "driverless car" were once only expressed in hushed terms lest the utterer be deemed disloyal to the golden days view of driving, but now they are bandied around without a care because we are already on that route.
The utterer's meaning is manifested in the utterance meaning.
Man retains in their essence the thinking of the utterer and responds-this is perhaps a sort of memory.
Isn't this because whenever the Kurdish deputies of the AKP dared to utter their ideas on this matter they were made to regret their venture with the threatening words from AKP leader Recep Tayyip Erdoy-an that "some remarks help to put an end to wars while others serve to ensure that its utterer is executed"?
By using these elements, the utterer intends to show that he wishes to accept and apply the norms and the rules of a linguistic community organized by e-mail and SMS communication.
19 Yet neither the utterer nor the hearer approaches through words the [relation of] attainment [between words and their objects] called 'inherence', which goes beyond the characteristics that are to be expressed.
As indicators of singularity, his invented syllables and guttural cries intern their utterer within the walls of his utterance; but, as products of translation (albeit of an unconventional nature), they propel their author into a skewed conversation with another voice, establishing and subverting a literary and cultural filiation with the genre of nonsense-writing that proved to have a series of far-reaching consequences, opening up the figurative and material walls of the asylum.
The essay, however, defends the interjection as "an appeal for sympathy which is humanizing, and compels the utterer to smooth his numbers".