Vague

(redirected from vaguest)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms.

Vague

Imprecise; uncertain; indefinite.

The term vague is frequently used in reference to a statute written in language that is so indefinite or lacking in precision that an individual of ordinary intelligence is forced to guess at its meaning. Statutes that are vague are ordinarily void on that ground.

Cross-references

Void for Vagueness Doctrine.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
She remembers only the vaguest and most complicated details about it all and her memory brings back scraps of detail that could well be a part of the mental mix-up the accident has caused her.
Hubble images have given only the vaguest of looks, but Dawn will open up this new world in high resolution.
I had only the vaguest idea of what these exotic materials were until I read M J Morgan's explanation, and I am glad to hear that Africa may begin exploring and exploiting these resources and challenge China's virtual monopoly in their trade.
Business-bot Paloma however continued to react to the vaguest sign of human emotion with the blank-eyed stare of the recently body-snatched.
There was not even the vaguest mention made by either the American Medical Association or the ACP.
It made for painful viewing, not just for England fans, but for anyone with even the vaguest idea of how to play the game.
WE MAY be loathe to admit it, but most blokes who show the vaguest of interest in cars are frustrated boy racers at heart.
Do you work for an organization that hasn't the vaguest idea of what it's doing?
Prior to the tragic events of 9/11, most Americans had only the vaguest impression of Islam, principally gleaned from Hollywood films and literary novels involving the Crusades.
The pursuit of happiness is vaguest of things guaranteed in the Bill of Rights.
Summary: Since the beginning of the presidential primaries, the vaguest and perhaps most abused term in the American political lexicon has been the word "change." Every candidate has claimed the mantle of change, some more credibly than others.
Instead, the text uses the vaguest wording possible, stating that "emissions must culminate in ten to 15 years' time and then be reduced to very low levels, well below 2000 levels," without referring to the IPCC's work.