lesion

(redirected from vascular lesion)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to vascular lesion: haemangioma

lesion

injury or loss. In the civil law jurisdictions the word is often used in the context of an ‘unfair’ loss, as where an adult takes advantage of a minor or someone purchases something for much less than it's worth.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

LESION, contracts. In the civil law this term is used to signify the injury suffered, in consequence of inequality of situation, by one who does not receive a full equivalent for what he gives in a commutative contract.
     2. The remedy given for this injury, is founded on its being the effect of implied error or imposition; for in every commutative contract, equivalents are supposed to be given and received. Louis. Code, 1854. Persons of full age, however, are not allowed in point of law to object to their agreements as being injurious, unless the injury be excessive. Poth. Oblig. P. 1, c. 1, s. 1, art. 3, Sec. 4. But minors are admitted to restitution, not only against any excessive inequality, but against any inequality whatever. Poth. Oblig. P. 1, c. 1, s. 1, art. 3, Sec. 5; Louis. Code, art. 1858.
     3. Courts of chancery relieve upon terms of redemption and set aside contracts entered into by expectant heirs dealing for their expectancies, on the ground of mere inadequacy of price. 1 Vern. 167; 2 Cox, 80; 2 Cas. in Ch. 136; 1 Vern. 141; 2 Vern. 121; 2 Freem. 111; 2 Vent. 359; 2 Vern. 14; 2 Rep. in Ch. 396; 1 P. W. 312; 1 Bro. C. C. 7; 3 P. Wms. 393, n.; 2 Atk. 133; 2 Ves. 125; 1 Atk. 301; 1 Wils. 286; 1 Wils. 320; 1 Bro. P. 6. ed. Toml. 198; 1 Bro. C. C. 1; 16 Ves. 512; Sugd. on Vend. 231, n. k.; 1 Ball & B. 330; Wightw. 25; 3 Ves. & Bea. 117; 2 Swanst. R. 147, n.; Fonb. notes to the Treatise of Equity, B, 1, c. 2, s. 9. A contract cannot stand where the party has availed himself of a confidential situation, in order to obtain some selfish advantage. Note to Crowe v. Ballard. 1 Ves. jun. 125; 1 Hov. Supp. 66, 7. Note to Wharton v. May. 5 Ves. 27; 1 Hov. Supp. 378. See Catching bargain; Fraud; Sale.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
The present case illustrates that any enlarging vascular lesion, even within the spleen, should be referred for surgical evaluation and resection as it may represent a unique presentation of HEHE.
Vascular Lesions. Small vascular lesions like MA, IRMA, and NV that were sometimes hard to detect or distinguish in IR images or fundus photos could be clearly identified in AOSLO images.
Other causes of vascular lesions potentially generating digestive bleeding
KMS is not associated with infantile hemangiomas (which are common benign vascular lesions) but occurs almost exclusively as a complication of other rare entities such as kaposiform hemangioendotheliomas (KHE) and tufted angiomas (TA).
Weiss, "Atypical vascular lesions after surgery and radiation of the breast: a clinicopathologic study of 32 cases analyzing histologic heterogeneity and association with angiosarcoma," American Journal of Surgical Pathology, vol.
Clinicopathological and immunohistochemical study of 30 cases of post-radiation atypical vascular lesion of the breast.
If a vascular lesion is identified on imaging but fine-needle aspiration fails to yield a diagnosis, a hemangioma should be considered in the differential diagnosis.
The oral cavity, head and neck regions possess complex, rich and intricate blood vessels which might be a predisposing factor for a variety of vascular lesions. These lesions represent the most common growths in infancy and childhood, and may vary from small innocent birthmarks to large disfiguring tumours.
Digital subtraction cerebral angiography (DSA) showed multiple vascular lesions, including an obvious saccular aneurysm on the left anterior choroidal artery.
The circumscribed vascular lesion was well-demarcated from the testicular parenchyma by a fibrous 0.1-cm pseudocapsule.
Gavin Britz, MBBCh, MPH, FNS, chairman of neurosurgery at Houston Methodist Neurological Institute, used a minimally-invasive technique to remove a vascular lesion from deep within Ryan Vincent's brain, the first to use this technique in the region.